Literary Theory and Criticism

Home › Literature › Analysis of Kate Chopin’s The Story of an Hour

Analysis of Kate Chopin’s The Story of an Hour

By NASRULLAH MAMBROL on July 28, 2021

Originally entitled “The Dream of an Hour” when it was first published in Vogue (December 1894), “The Story of an Hour” has since become one of Kate Chopin’s most frequently anthologized stories. Among her shortest and most daring works, “Story” examines issues of feminism, namely, a woman’s dissatisfaction in a conventional marriage and her desire for independence. It also features Chopin’s characteristic irony and ambiguity .

The story begins with Louise Mallard’s being told about her husband’s presumed death in a train accident. Louise initially weeps with wild abandon, then retires alone to her upstairs bedroom. As she sits facing the open window, observing the new spring life outside, she realizes with a “clear and exalted perception” that she is now free of her husband’s “powerful will bending hers” (353). She becomes delirious with the prospect that she can now live for herself and prays that her life may be long. Her newfound independence is short-lived, however. In a surprise ending, her husband walks through the front door, and Louise suffers a heart attack and dies. Her death may be considered a tragic defeat or a pyrrhic victory for a woman who would rather die than lose that “possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being” (353). The doctors ironically attribute her death to the “joy that kills” (354).

BIBLIOGRAPHY Chopin, Kate. The Complete Works of Kate Chopin. Edited by Per Seyersted. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1969. Koloski, Bernard. Kate Chopin: A Study of the Short Fiction. New York: Twayne, 1996. Seyersted, Per. Kate Chopin: A Critical Biography. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1969. Toth, Emily. Kate Chopin. New York: Morrow, 1990

thesis statement for a story of an hour

Share this:

Categories: Literature , Short Story

Tags: American Literature , Analysis of Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour , calicut university materials of Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour , criticism of Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour , Kate Chopin , Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour , Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour criticism , Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour essay , Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour notes , Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour plot , Literary Criticism , plotKate Chopin's The Story of an Hour , summary of Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour , The Dream of an Hour , themes of Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour

Related Articles

Italo Calvino

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Analysis of "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin

Self-Determination and Louise Mallard Living for Herself

 D Fu Tong Zhao /EyeEm/Getty Images

  • Short Stories
  • Best Sellers
  • Classic Literature
  • Plays & Drama
  • Shakespeare
  • Children's Books
  • Ph.D., English, State University of New York at Albany
  • B.A., English, Brown University

"The Story of an Hour" by American author Kate Chopin is a mainstay of feminist literary study . Originally published in 1894, the story documents the complicated reaction of Louise Mallard upon learning of her husband's death.

It is difficult to discuss "The Story of an Hour" without addressing the ironic ending. If you haven't read the story yet, you might as well, as it's only about 1,000 words. The Kate Chopin International Society is kind enough to provide a free, accurate version .

At the Beginning, News That Will Devastate Louise

At the beginning of the story, Richards and Josephine believe they must break the news of Brently Mallard's death to Louise Mallard as gently as possible. Josephine informs her "in broken sentences; veiled hints that revealed in half concealing." Their assumption, not an unreasonable one, is that this unthinkable news will be devastating to Louise and will threaten her weak heart.

A Growing Awareness of Freedom

Yet something even more unthinkable lurks in this story: Louise's growing awareness of the freedom she will have without Brently.

At first, she doesn't consciously allow herself to think about this freedom. The knowledge reaches her wordlessly and symbolically, via the "open window" through which she sees the "open square" in front of her house. The repetition of the word "open" emphasizes possibility and a lack of restrictions.

Patches of Blue Sky Amid the Clouds

The scene is full of energy and hope. The trees are "all aquiver with the new spring of life," the "delicious breath of rain" is in the air, sparrows are twittering, and Louise can hear someone singing a song in the distance. She can see "patches of blue sky" amid the clouds.

She observes these patches of blue sky without registering what they might mean. Describing Louise's gaze, Chopin writes, "It was not a glance of reflection, but rather indicated a suspension of intelligent thought." If she had been thinking intelligently, social norms might have prevented her from such a heretical recognition. Instead, the world offers her "veiled hints" that she slowly pieces together without even realizing she is doing so.

A Force Is Too Powerful to Oppose

In fact, Louise resists the impending awareness, regarding it "fearfully." As she begins to realize what it is, she strives "to beat it back with her will." Yet its force is too powerful to oppose.

This story can be uncomfortable to read because, on the surface, Louise seems to be glad that her husband has died. But that isn't quite accurate. She thinks of Brently's "kind, tender hands" and "the face that had never looked save with love upon her," and she recognizes that she has not finished weeping for him.

Her Desire for Self-Determination

But his death has made her see something she hasn't seen before and might likely never have seen if he had lived: her desire for self-determination .

Once she allows herself to recognize her approaching freedom, she utters the word "free" over and over again, relishing it. Her fear and her uncomprehending stare are replaced by acceptance and excitement. She looks forward to "years to come that would belong to her absolutely."

She Would Live for Herself

In one of the most important passages of the story, Chopin describes Louise's vision of self-determination. It's not so much about getting rid of her husband as it is about being entirely in charge of her own life, "body and soul." Chopin writes:

"There would be no one to live for her during those coming years; she would live for herself. There would be no powerful will bending hers in that blind persistence with which men and women believe they have a right to impose a will upon a fellow-creature."

Note the phrase men and women. Louise never catalogs any specific offenses Brently has committed against her; rather, the implication seems to be that marriage can be stifling for both parties.

The Irony of Joy That Kills

When Brently Mallard enters the house alive and well in the final scene, his appearance is utterly ordinary. He is "a little travel-stained, composedly carrying his grip-sack and umbrella." His mundane appearance contrasts greatly with Louise's "feverish triumph" and her walking down the stairs like a "goddess of Victory."

When the doctors determine that Louise "died of heart disease -- of joy that kills," the reader immediately recognizes the irony . It seems clear that her shock was not joy over her husband's survival, but rather distress over losing her cherished, newfound freedom. Louise did briefly experience joy -- the joy of imagining herself in control of her own life. And it was the removal of that intense joy that led to her death.

  • 'A Doll's House' Summary
  • "The Story of an Hour" Characters
  • Quotes From 'The Story of an Hour' by Kate Chopin
  • 'The Story of an Hour' Questions for Study and Discussion
  • Kate Chopin's 'The Awakening' of Edna Pontellier
  • Biography of Kate Chopin, American Author and Protofeminist
  • Analysis of 'The Yellow Wallpaper' by C. Perkins Gilman
  • 'The Awakening' Quotes
  • Kate Chopin's 'The Storm': Quick Summary and Analysis
  • 'Their Eyes Were Watching God' Themes, Symbols, and Literary Devices
  • Miss Brill's Fragile Fantasy
  • "The Woman Destroyed" by Simone de Beauvoir
  • "Anna Karenina" Study Guide
  • Biography of Harriet Tubman
  • 5 Things You Need to Know About "The Glass Castle"
  • Jane Eyre Study Guide

Home — Essay Samples — Literature — The Story of An Hour — The Theme Of Freedom In The Story Of An Hour By Kate Chopin

test_template

The Theme of Freedom in The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin

  • Categories: Freedom Kate Chopin The Story of An Hour

About this sample

close

Words: 685 |

Published: Jan 28, 2021

Words: 685 | Pages: 2 | 4 min read

Kate Chopin's short story, "The Story of an Hour," explores the theme of unrealized freedom through the lens of characterization and irony. The narrative delves into the complex emotions that arise when freedom unexpectedly dawns, only to be swiftly extinguished.

Characterization plays a pivotal role in conveying the transformation of Mrs. Mallard. Her character evolves significantly as she grapples with the sudden realization of freedom. The story employs irony to underscore the situation's complexity. While Mrs. Mallard initially fixates on her husband's death, the world outside her window is bursting with life, creating a stark contrast. The gift of freedom allows Mrs. Mallard to further develop her character. Although she cherished her husband, the allure of newfound freedom becomes irresistible.

In "The Story of an Hour," freedom is depicted as a precious but fleeting gift. Chopin uses irony to reveal the stark contrast between appearances and reality, while characterization illuminates Mrs. Mallard's transformation in the face of unexpected freedom. Ultimately, the story underscores the idea that freedom should be cherished, even if it is brief and elusive.

Works Cited

  • Chopin, K. (1894). The Story of an Hour. Vogue, 23(1), 1-2.
  • Dictionary.com. (n.d.). Freedom. In Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved from https://www.dictionary.com/browse/freedom
  • Merriam-Webster. (n.d.). Freedom. In Merriam-Webster.com dictionary. Retrieved from https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/freedom
  • Berkove, L. (2000). Fatal Self-Assertion in Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour". American Literary Realism, 32(2), 152-158.
  • Taylor, H. (1994). Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour": A Feminist Reading. The Mississippi Quarterly, 47(4), 527-536.
  • Toth, E. W. (1994). Chopin's "The Story of an Hour". The Explicator, 52(1), 22-23.
  • Papke, M. (1995). Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour": A Response to Feminist Criticism. The Southern Literary Journal, 27(2), 42-50.
  • Halliburton, D. (2002). Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour. Explicator, 60(4), 211-213.
  • Niederhoff, B. (2014). Kate Chopin, "The Story of an Hour". In B. Niederhoff (Ed.), A Companion to American Short Story (pp. 159-169). John Wiley & Sons.
  • Berkove, L. (2003). Fatal Self-Assertion in Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour". In S. M. Gilbert & S. Gubar (Eds.), The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Tradition in English (3rd ed., pp. 1104-1108). W.W. Norton & Company.

Image of Dr. Charlotte Jacobson

Cite this Essay

Let us write you an essay from scratch

  • 450+ experts on 30 subjects ready to help
  • Custom essay delivered in as few as 3 hours

Get high-quality help

author

Prof. Kifaru

Verified writer

  • Expert in: Life Literature

writer

+ 120 experts online

By clicking “Check Writers’ Offers”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy policy . We’ll occasionally send you promo and account related email

No need to pay just yet!

Related Essays

2 pages / 726 words

2 pages / 1058 words

6 pages / 2729 words

Remember! This is just a sample.

You can get your custom paper by one of our expert writers.

121 writers online

The Theme of Freedom in The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin Essay

Still can’t find what you need?

Browse our vast selection of original essay samples, each expertly formatted and styled

Related Essays on The Story of An Hour

Kate Chopin’s short story “The Story of an Hour” is a captivating and thought-provoking tale that delves into the complexities of human emotions and the impact of societal norms on an individual’s psyche. The story revolves [...]

Freedom and self-assertion have been significant themes in literature, especially during periods of social change. In Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour," the author skillfully employs literary devices to explore the theme of [...]

Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour" is a short story that explores the internal conflict of the protagonist, Mrs. Mallard, and her pursuit of personal freedom. The story is set during the late 19th century, a time when societal [...]

Women’s role in society has always been a widely-discussed topic. The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin are two stories that explore this issue. Do you want to compare and [...]

Death can have different meanings to a person. Sometimes people get joy from it and most of the times they do not. Most widows would respond in a sorrowful way towards their husband’s death, but Louise responded in a untroubled [...]

American literature varies from other literary works across the world. Every story seems to express a different theme, and yet somehow they all seem similar. The Gift of the Magi and The Story of an Hour, written within 15 years [...]

Related Topics

By clicking “Send”, you agree to our Terms of service and Privacy statement . We will occasionally send you account related emails.

Where do you want us to send this sample?

By clicking “Continue”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy policy.

Be careful. This essay is not unique

This essay was donated by a student and is likely to have been used and submitted before

Download this Sample

Free samples may contain mistakes and not unique parts

Sorry, we could not paraphrase this essay. Our professional writers can rewrite it and get you a unique paper.

Please check your inbox.

We can write you a custom essay that will follow your exact instructions and meet the deadlines. Let's fix your grades together!

Get Your Personalized Essay in 3 Hours or Less!

We use cookies to personalyze your web-site experience. By continuing we’ll assume you board with our cookie policy .

  • Instructions Followed To The Letter
  • Deadlines Met At Every Stage
  • Unique And Plagiarism Free

thesis statement for a story of an hour

Analysis of “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin Research Paper

  • To find inspiration for your paper and overcome writer’s block
  • As a source of information (ensure proper referencing)
  • As a template for you assignment

Introduction

External and internal conflict, physical and cultural setting, literary devices, works cited.

Unfortunately, oppression of women is a severe and extended process that was especially active in the 1890s. A number of famous American writers of those years used their talent of choosing the right words to describe how women and men may oppress each other and deprive their beloved ones of freedom. A short writing “A Story of an Hour,” created by Kate Chopin in 1894, touches on the topic of unhappiness during the marriage.

A woman named Louise Mallard is informed of her husband’s tragic death. While trying to process this information and understand her own feelings, the woman wants to be alone in her room. Unexpectedly, instead of continuing mourning and grieving, Louise meets with another feeling – freedom. While knowing that she will miss her husband, the woman also feels relieved that she will not have to live with him for years – she is now free. However, when she learns that her husband is actually alive, she dies, as noted by the doctors, “of heart disease–of the joy that kills” (Chopin). It is possible to say that the story evokes strange emotions and leaves an ambiguous impression, making one think about the connections between love, marriage, happiness, and freedom.

In “The Story of an Hour,” there is both internal and external conflict. The essence of the latter is in the opposition of a person to society and its norms. Chopin refers to one of “the numerous paradoxes against which the woman had to survive in the American society in the 19 th century” – imposed roles and stereotypes (Kusi and Zetang-Jua 2). When finally feeling free, Louise joyfully realized that “there would be no powerful will bending hers in that blind persistence with which men and women believe they have a right to impose a private will upon a fellow-creature” (Chopin). Thus, it is evident that the conflict discussed in the short story is between the society that wants males and females to follow their roles and real people who are tired of stereotypes and taken freedom.

Further, the second conflict in “The Story of an Hour” is the internal struggle and confusion of Louise. It is challenging for her to understand and accept the duality of her feelings. On the one hand, her husband loved her and never treated her badly, which is why it is difficult to name her marriage unhappy. On the other hand, being someone’s spouse deprived the woman of her right to make decisions and live in the way she wanted. Mrs. Mallard is simultaneously relieved and overwhelmed by the terrible news and tries to decide whether her new freedom or old happiness is greater:

And yet she had loved him – sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being!

“Free! Body and soul free!” she kept whispering… (Chopin)

This is probably why Louise dies when her husband returns home. The woman has already accepted her new happiness, has imagined and loved living alone, and the great news of her spouse being alive makes it impossible for her to return to reality.

The setting in the story is also essential for understanding the conflict and main idea. As mentioned above, the story takes action in the 19 th century when many roles and stereotypes were imposed on both males and females (Jassam and Jassam 2). Such a circumstance weighs on Louise, not allowing her to understand that she is being oppressed (Yazgı 148), but these societal norms do not seem to bother her sister and husband’s friend (Chopin). The physical setting in the story is the Mallards’ house. It is a neutral territory where Louise is both happy and safe, but her freedom is somewhere else, behind the window. Finally, the time in the story is limited – all events take one hour, and the author shows how much a character’s feelings and life, in general, can change in such a small amount of time.

As with most literary works, this short story is filled with numerous language devices that add to the ambiguity and power of “The Story of an Hour.” To begin with, it is essential to discuss repetition since, as noticed by Hu, it is “replete with repetition of words, phrases, structures, ideas, and themes” (1). Among many other examples, the window in Louise’s room is selected to prove the point of this paragraph. There are three sentences in which the window is mentioned in a similar form: “There stood, facing the open window, a comfortable, roomy armchair,” “There were patches of blue sky showing here and there through the clouds that had met and piled one above the other in the west facing her window,” and “she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window” (Chopin). According to Hu, the repetition in these fragments is used to portray Mrs. Mallard as a vivid woman who suddenly changes her mind (3). Therefore, this literary device is needed to allow the readers better understand Louise.

Another language device in this short story is symbolism, and it is also discussed in the example of the window and the doors in Mrs. Mallard’s house. When trying to process the news and imagine her future life, she is looking precisely out the window and realizes her freedom, feels being “body and soul free” (Chopin). The window is the symbol of liberty, life, and uncommon happiness for Louise. At the same time, the doors in their house symbolize the past and death as they provide no escape from stereotypes, oppression, and unhappy marriage. When Mrs. Mallard locks herself in her room, the closed door is a symbol of the past she has left behind; however, opening the door for her sister means that Louise returns to her past and is going to meet her death. It is also interesting that, for Mr. Mallard, the front door that he enters actually symbolizes life, so this is a dual symbolism – if her husband is alive, Louise has to die to be free.

To draw a conclusion, one may say that “The Story of an Hour” is indeed rather ambiguous writing that leaves the reader with confusing emotions. Is it correct to consider Louise’s death as the final escape from oppression and unhappy marriage? Was it possible for her to live happily with her husband, who loved and admired her? These are the questions I have after reading the story. The opposition between death and life, social norms and self-perception, and marriage and freedom make this story, written in just a few paragraphs, unique in terms of feminist literature.

Chopin, Kate. “The Story of an Hour.” Virginia Commonwealth University , 1894.

Hu, Aihua. “The Art of Repetition in ‘The Story of an Hour’.” A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews , 2020, pp. 1-6.

Jassam, Aseel Hatif, and Hadeel Hatif Jassam. “Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour”: A Feminist Discourse of a Married Woman Reclaiming Her Lost Female Identity.” Social Sciences International Research Journal , vol. 6, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1-5.

Kusi, David Toh, and Zetang-Jua, Amandine Ankainkom. “Aesthetic Significance and Biographical Signposting: Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour” and the Release of Patriarchal Grief.” International Journal of Integrative Humanism , vol. 12, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1-9.

Yazgı, Cihan. “Tragic Elements and Discourse-Time in ‘The Story of an Hour’.” The Explicator, vol. 78, no. 3-4, 2020, pp. 147-152.

  • Kate Chopin’s The Story of an Hour
  • Marriage in "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin
  • Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour”
  • Theme of Empathy in “Parable of the Sower” by Octavia Butler
  • “The Winter of Frankie Machine” by Don Winslow
  • The Importance of Being Earnest
  • "Bad English" in "Minor Feelings" Literature
  • “Destructive Generation: Second Thoughts About the Sixties” by Horowitz
  • Chicago (A-D)
  • Chicago (N-B)

IvyPanda. (2023, April 6). Analysis of “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin. https://ivypanda.com/essays/analysis-of-the-story-of-an-hour-by-kate-chopin/

"Analysis of “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin." IvyPanda , 6 Apr. 2023, ivypanda.com/essays/analysis-of-the-story-of-an-hour-by-kate-chopin/.

IvyPanda . (2023) 'Analysis of “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin'. 6 April.

IvyPanda . 2023. "Analysis of “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin." April 6, 2023. https://ivypanda.com/essays/analysis-of-the-story-of-an-hour-by-kate-chopin/.

1. IvyPanda . "Analysis of “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin." April 6, 2023. https://ivypanda.com/essays/analysis-of-the-story-of-an-hour-by-kate-chopin/.

Bibliography

IvyPanda . "Analysis of “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin." April 6, 2023. https://ivypanda.com/essays/analysis-of-the-story-of-an-hour-by-kate-chopin/.

You're reading a free article with opinions that may differ from The Motley Fool's Premium Investing Services. Become a Motley Fool member today to get instant access to our top analyst recommendations, in-depth research, investing resources, and more. Learn More

Fools Look at Chewy's Roaring Kitty Experience

You’re reading a free article with opinions that may differ from The Motley Fool’s Premium Investing Services. Become a Motley Fool member today to get instant access to our top analyst recommendations, in-depth research, investing resources , and more. Learn More

Chewy Stock Quote

And check in on the Six Flags/Cedar Fair merger that's now complete.

In this podcast, Motley Fool analyst Asit Sharma and host Ricky Mulvey discuss Chewy becoming a meme stock, Cedar Fair and Six Flags merging into one company, and headlines from five years in the future.

To catch full episodes of all The Motley Fool's free podcasts, check out our podcast center . To get started investing, check out our quick-start guide to investing in stocks . A full transcript follows the video.

This video was recorded on July 02, 2024.

Ricky Mulvey: It's a big day for roller coaster investors. You're listening to Motley Fool Money. I'm Ricky Mulvey joined today by Asit Sharma. Asit, we've been talking for about 10 minutes. Still lovely to see you. Thanks for being here.

Asit Sharma: I'm going to pretend I just got on and saw you for the first time. Great to see you, Ricky.

Ricky Mulvey: Sometimes we do hop on for the first time, but sometimes we chat about things that we can't chat about on the show. Anyway, let's talk about Chewy.

Asit Sharma: You're piquing everyone's interest now, Ricky, but let's move forward with this show.

Ricky Mulvey: I was telling Asit my deep dark secrets. Someone who had maybe a little bit of a secret up until a couple of weeks ago was Keith Gill, or last week, AKA the Roaring Kitty guy. Last week, I wondered with Tim Beyers why pet retailer Chewy had surged more than 60% in a month. Then it turns out Roaring Kitty, one of the leaders of the GameStop stock frenzy. He had a movie made about him, and he was the leaders of the online retail investor movement that was buying up the stock and squeezing the shorts on that. Turns out he's interested in Chewy now. We found out that he owns about 7% of the whole company. That's a quarter billion dollar. This is an interesting activist to have on your team or interesting stockholder to have on your team if you're Chewy, but let's focus on the shareholders, like me, Asit, what should Chewy shareholders do with the news of Roaring Kitty owning 7% of the whole company?

Asit Sharma: I think what I'm going to say here is obvious, Ricky, that shareholders should prepare for a little more volatility than normal, but Chewy's been a volatile stock. The company is profitable. It has amazing loyalty for its products. Its average spend goes up every year for those who purchase its products for their pets, but they have this long term plan to improve margins. It's taking some time. Investors worry about the margins, the stock has been down. As you point out, suddenly, mysteriously creeping up, and this is part of that picture, but what does it mean for the long term?

Asit Sharma: I actually don't think it means as much as this meant to GameStop when GameStop was hovering, under $1,000,000,000 in market capitalization, and Keith Gill was starting to accumulate his first position, just starting to get on YouTube and talk about this company. These are two very different situations.

Ricky Mulvey: It was pretty funny. Did you see the SEC form where he he created his own question that said, Are you a cat, and said, I am a cat. I am not a cat, and he checked that I am not a cat box. The second time the jokes usually not as funny, though, that got me this morning. That got this cynical podcaster Asit.

Asit Sharma: Hey, well, I think you've got a point there. Let's talk about that, the second time round, is the joke as funny. One of the reasons that the magic worked for Roaring Kitty was that he was going into businesses that had a very uncertain path of cash flow development. You look at GameStop hovering on the edge, teetering toward, potential bankruptcy. They've made a business out of selling their shares whenever he pushes their stock up. In fact, he resurfaced, and I believe Gamestop took quick advantage of that and sold some shares, raised some money.

Here, on the other hand, you've got Chewy, which has massive distribution centers. They have been working on their business development for years, an established company with much more predictable cash flows. With that customer loyalty, comes very stable cash flows. When investors look at propositions that are more certain, the stocks are less likely to get pushed around in the near term. A highly uncertain company where that is in doubt, could move a lot. Now, I know I just said that Chewy has been volatile, but part of that is investors resetting expectations for the near term after a fairly successful IPO, and then the hard business of getting that model to scale up, which it's scaling up. I think for you, Ricky, you own shares, It's going to jump around a lot, but if your thesis is still that folks are going to buy more food for their pets, and this company has the widest offering of SKUs and maybe the biggest distribution system for that, not a bad thesis.

Ricky Mulvey: I think that's a little more complex than mine. I think customer love was a big part of my Chewy thesis, but I have been a little troubled by their seemingly inability to get more customers on the platform. GameStop also gaining about $2 billion in cash on the books from selling shares for the latest run up. We'll see if Chewy has been able to take similar advantage of that.

All right, Asit. Let's talk about roller coasters, shall we? Because Cedar Fair and Six Flags have officially merged into the largest theme park operator. Twenty-sever theme parks, 15 water parks, nine hotels, Cedar Fair, and Six Flags calling this a merger of equals. I get a little skeptical at that. Anytime two companies come together, someone likes to be the alpha. Are you buying the merger of equals like the billing says?

Asit Sharma: I think so. I think both of these companies are faced with a tough market in their industry because the consumer has a little bit less purchasing power after the pandemic. Both companies are highly indebted. It takes money to open these parks, Ricky. There's a considerable debt burden that both have. The problems are similar. The overarching problems tend to lend to consolidation in this industry, and here you've got a company now that is going to span the whole bottom half of the United States, a lot of coverage on the East Coast, good coverage on the Midwest. Maybe they can find some economies of scale. I'm not too worried about 1% shifting here or another. What's your take on this idea that there are a merger of equals? I grew up playing Roller Coaster Tycoon, and I grew up playing Planet Coaster. The idea of an investment opportunity becoming more attractive with more roller coasters, hits me in a way that I am completely biased. I'm like, it makes sense, more roller coasters equals more money.

Ricky Mulvey: Naturally.

Asit Sharma: Now to actually answer your question, anytime a company's getting 51%, that may flex in unexpected ways down the road. Right now, they might be in a honeymoon period, where we're a merger of equals, but coming down the pike, the management team with 51% of the power may be able to use that. Let's talk about the consolidation because the pitch is that the deals going to create 200 million in synergies, 120 million from cost savings, and then $80,000,000 in extra earnings from an enhanced guest experience. They're going to use that extra money to pay off a lot of the debt load that you previously mentioned. That's the pitch to investors. You're an investing analyst. Are you buying that story?

Asit Sharma: May be buying that story, but it is something that's different. Let's take another company that uses a very similar pitch to investor, Starbucks . We're going to elevate the customer experience, and that's going to increase sales. I think that works easily for Starbucks because you're talking about a nominal spend out of someone's pocket. If that elevated customer experience results in maybe 20% or 30% more in rate hike on someone's latte, it's not such a big deal, but investing in customer experience is harder in this industry, just as in the cruise industry. Any of these industries where you're not looking at a small spend, but disposable income. Someone has to make a choice to go there. I wonder about that particular pitch to investors. We were talking just before taping. You sounded a little skeptical on that front.

Ricky Mulvey: Selim Bassoul is the CEO of Six Flags. He's the chairman of the new combined entity. His pitch when he came in is the CEO of Six Flags back in late 2021 was, we're actually going to decrease attendance a little bit. We're going to enhance the guest experience and raise prices a little bit. It seems that that hasn't quite happened at a lot of the Six Flags parks, operations continue to be tough. I'm not saying that I could do better. As an activist shareholder it sounds like an absolute nightmare to run a theme park, but the core customer of these theme parks is one that's a little bit more value conscious. There's takes in the financial media that this is a way for these parks to combine with Disney World and Universal . It's a completely separate offering. These writers do not understand roller coasters, Asit. but my take is it might not create the extra earnings that they may be pitching to the investors.

Asit Sharma: You may be on to something here, Ricky. I know when Selim did this at Six Flags, one of the things they're working on is to decrease the bottleneck at the gate. You go to the park, you have to wait to get in. By making it a more selective customer, maybe you have smaller lines, but then you're going to get people who want to spend inside the park. I don't think that happened. When you raise food prices and make that food a little more upscale, you're still faced with the same dynamic of people who are trying to avoid spending on food because they want that allocation to go to the rides. People more often want to sneak in food to Roller Coaster Parks. I'm not laughing at anyone who's listening today. My family did that way back when, when we used to go to Roller Coaster Parks long time ago. This is something, it's a dynamic in the industry which I know Selim Bassoul has a desire to change the way people think of these parks, but they're really adrenaline experiences, aren't they? You're taking your kids to go on a roller coaster. You want to make Ricky Mulvey's eyes grow wide. You're not really taking Ricky to go sit in a glorified food court and eat overpriced french fries.

Ricky Mulvey: No, I grew up going to Kings Island a lot in Cincinnati. That's where you went, because if you're a teenager and you're bored on a summer day and you want to get out of the house with your friends, it's a really good option.

Asit Sharma: I have been there. Amazing place.

Ricky Mulvey: Last thing I'll say on this too, is sometimes the extra earnings comes at the cost of the regular guest experience. These parks Cedar Fair and Six Flags introduce more of these like paid fast passes. What ends up happening is you get pure revenue, pure profit from people paying to skip the line. Then on the other side, people are going to be waiting in more one, two hour lines for that quick ride on the roller coaster. It's something that, honestly, I think may hurt them a little bit more down the road. Last thing on this topic. Whenever I think of these types of companies, it's a really fun company that catches your attention. It's so fun from the Peter Lynch perspective. Go to the theme park, evaluate it as an investment. It's not a boring company. Even with this merger, the synergies, the defined offering. I'm going to give you the new Six Flags, or I'm going to give you an S&P 500 index fund for your hundred dollars Asit, what are you taking?

Asit Sharma: You've put me between a rock and rock, Ricky. Right now, I'm scared of the index because the Big Tech has propelled it so high. And here's a company that I really would love to wait and see. I'd rather visit the combined company and look at the guest experience and commit that $100 today, but if you press me on it, I'll go to rock in a hard place and say, I'd still rather put the money in S&P 500 index, even though I love fun ideas. There are other fun ideas. Look, Disney itself had problems last year with the same type of fast pass dynamic in their parks.is a hard business. Maybe go for a company that's got a little more diversified hook. I know Disney, it's boring, but you've heard me tout the virtues of Disney before. I almost would rather put my hundred in Disney as a value play there and we haven't even talked about inside out to this week. Maybe we could chat about that soon, but we should move on.

Ricky Mulvey: No, it made $1 billion at the box office.

Asit Sharma: Totally.

Ricky Mulvey: I'm not ready to overreact and say the movies are all the way back, but it was a good win for Disney. Final topic. Asit, we've got Fool Fest in a couple of weeks. I'm really looking forward to it, July 14th through the 16th. We'll be in DC, talking to members, and hopefully I get to see you there. One of the things I'm going to be asking, I'm going to try to get some audio for the show, is what's your headline from 2029? We're traveling five years into the future and reading some newspapers there. Investors, you want to think about the future. You want to think about what's headed or what's coming, excuse me. I'll start with you, just to maybe get the ideas flowing as people get hyped up for Fool Fest. What is your headline from 2029?

Asit Sharma: Investment AGI Eddie says no need to invest in US stocks from this point forward. Simply invest in AGI Eddie.

Ricky Mulvey: Why is that?

Asit Sharma: AGI, artificial general intelligence. We keep hearing this term in the press. This is the moment where creative intelligence and artificial intelligence, human like intelligence merge, and we get this all powerful AI that will be as intelligent in many different stratifications as human intelligence. That's the moment where many people predict the worst is going to happen. There'll be this AI apocalypse. Now, five years from now, it's not going to happen, but I thought it would be fun just to think ahead, what happens to investing when an all powerful intelligence takes over. My first one is sort of sarcastic.

Ricky Mulvey: Do you think it'll solve the problem of having to research and pick stocks? You can just hit a button that you could say and solve the problem for you.

Asit Sharma: On a more serious note, this question has fascinated me for a long time. I think markets always have a way of thwarting the best technologies. Even if you have AIs competing against each other to root out the best stocks, it almost becomes like commoditized intelligence. They're all going to look at the same thing. The winners will be those who look away from the crowd. Investing, I have a feeling, is always going to be a hard game, even if the computers eventually take over. By the way, I don't think they will. I think the best human investors, plus the best AI will be the way to go in the future in terms of investing and probably many other things in life.

Ricky Mulvey: You're not just hitting a button and saying, well, that was easy. Anyway, the one I got is a little bit more basic, but JCPenney closes for Pickleball Entertainment Center. Actually, I think the Pickleball trend is going to keep going. It's become an acceptable way for people to socialize and meet new people in person. I think that part of the trend is really going to continue, and especially as more department stores close, and you have all of this large retail space with good parking lots, and the demand for experiences continues to increase. I think these are going to blow up, and I think they're going to be sticking around for a while.

Asit Sharma: Really love that headline, Ricky. I'm going to tease here. You and I are probably going to talk in the near future about something else that's coming into malls that would otherwise go out of business, but let's leave that.

Ricky Mulvey: Do you got another headline or do you want to save it for Fool Fest?

Asit Sharma: I have one.

Ricky Mulvey: One more. Let's hear it.

Asit Sharma: I see this headline on the front page of Barons. Selling at just four times 2029 revenue of $1 trillion, is Amazon undervalued?

Ricky Mulvey: I love that. That's a good place to end it and that's less sarcastic. Here we go Asit.

Asit Sharma: This is halfway serious. If you follow analyst projections out for the next four years, it's easy to see that amazon.com will be on the cusp of $1 trillion in sales. It's never happened to any company on the face of this planet, but I think sometime next year, latest by 2026, Amazon is going to overtake Walmart as the world's largest retailer with some $600 billion in sales each year, and they're going to quickly scale up to $1 trillion. If you look at historical multiples, that means if they sell it four times that revenue in 2029, you've got to double from here on out, but what a ridiculous looking statement on the face of things.

Ricky Mulvey: Asit, we've had a lot of starts and stops in today's show. It has been quite a journey. Hopefully, you, the listener, have not noticed, but I appreciate you being here. More so, I appreciate our engineer, Tim Sparks for cleaning this up. Asit, thanks for your time and your insight.

Asit Sharma: Thanks, Ricky and thanks Tim for cleaning up this roller coaster of taping today, but it was fun.

Ricky Mulvey: As always, people on the program may have interests in the stocks they talk about, and the Motley Fool may have formal recommendations for or against, so don't buy or sell anything based solely on what you hear. I'm Ricky Mulvey. Thanks for listening. We'll be back tomorrow.

John Mackey, former CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Asit Sharma has positions in Amazon and Walt Disney. Ricky Mulvey has positions in Chewy and Walt Disney. The Motley Fool has positions in and recommends Amazon, Cedar Fair, Chewy, Starbucks, Walmart, and Walt Disney. The Motley Fool recommends Six Flags Entertainment. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy .

Related Articles

pets_woman hugs cat

Premium Investing Services

Invest better with The Motley Fool. Get stock recommendations, portfolio guidance, and more from The Motley Fool's premium services.

IMAGES

  1. 45 Perfect Thesis Statement Templates (+ Examples) ᐅ TemplateLab

    thesis statement for a story of an hour

  2. The Story of an Hour

    thesis statement for a story of an hour

  3. The story of an hour thesis summary writing

    thesis statement for a story of an hour

  4. The Story of an Hour Analysis & Summary

    thesis statement for a story of an hour

  5. Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"

    thesis statement for a story of an hour

  6. Story of an Hour Kate Chopin Essay Sample

    thesis statement for a story of an hour

VIDEO

  1. Writing the Thesis Statement

  2. How to Write a Thesis Statement Workshop

  3. What is a effective thesis statement?

  4. The Story Of An Hour summary / ملخص قصة ساعة

  5. How to write a good thesis statement!? M.sc/Phd📕#thesis#statement#viralshorts

  6. EXPLAINING THESIS STATEMENT SIMPLY

COMMENTS

  1. Thesis Statement Ideas for "The Story of an Hour"

    Summary: Thesis statement ideas for "The Story of an Hour" could include exploring the theme of freedom and independence as experienced by the protagonist, the irony of the protagonist's ...

  2. What's a good thesis statement for "The Story of an Hour"?

    A good thesis statement for this story might discuss the fact that the original title of the story was "The Dream of an Hour." A good paper could be written discussing all the various ways and ...

  3. What's a good thesis statement about identity for "The Story of an Hour

    Your thesis statement would, of course, need to be directly related to the argument you wanted to make about identity. However, given the brevity and tight focus of the story, you could make a ...

  4. 108 The Story of an Hour Essay Topics & Examples

    The Story of an Hour as an early feminist story. In your essay, you can study feminist aspects of Chopin's story. For instance, you may look into female liberation, marriage as a trap, and other similar themes. Mrs. Mallard's death as liberation. The main character of the story, Mrs. Mallard, longs to be free.

  5. Analysis of Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour

    Originally entitled "The Dream of an Hour" when it was first published in Vogue (December 1894), "The Story of an Hour" has since become one of Kate Chopin's most frequently anthologized stories. Among her shortest and most daring works, "Story" examines issues of feminism, namely, a woman's dissatisfaction in a conventional marriage and her desire…

  6. The Story of an Hour Critical Analysis Essay

    The Story of an Hour was written by Kate Chopin in 1984. It describes a woman, Mrs. Mallard, who lost her husband in an accident, but later the truth came out, and the husband was alive. This essay will discuss The Story of an Hour with emphasis on the plot and development of the protagonist, Mrs. Mallard, who goes through contrasting emotions ...

  7. Analysis, Themes and Summary of "The Story of an Hour" by ...

    This article includes a summary, as well as a look at themes, symbolism and irony. Summary of "The Story of an Hour". Mrs. Mallard, who has heart trouble, is gently given the news that her husband has been killed in a train accident. Her husband's friend Richards found out at the newspaper office, confirmed the name, and went to her sister ...

  8. Analysis of "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin

    Updated on May 24, 2019. "The Story of an Hour" by American author Kate Chopin is a mainstay of feminist literary study. Originally published in 1894, the story documents the complicated reaction of Louise Mallard upon learning of her husband's death. It is difficult to discuss "The Story of an Hour" without addressing the ironic ending.

  9. Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour": Feminist Statement

    In her short work "The Story of an Hour" that was first published in 1894, Chopin considers a woman's position in the patriarchal society from the feminist view, and it is possible to discuss this story as a feminist statement and analyze it from two perspectives. Thus, specific feminist ideas in "The Story of an Hour" can be ...

  10. A Literary Analysis of "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin

    In Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour," the author skillfully employs literary devices to explore the theme of female liberation and the constraints of marriage. Through the lens of Mrs. Mallard's experiences, the story reveals the complexities of societal expectations and the potential for personal freedom. This essay will analyze how Chopin ...

  11. Thesis Statement For The Story of An Hour by Kate Chopin

    Crafting a thesis statement for Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour" can be challenging due to the story's complexity, brevity, and rich symbolism. Students must carefully analyze the story's themes of female independence, marriage, and freedom to write an insightful thesis. While developing a thesis requires consideration of Chopin's style and historical context, some students ...

  12. Why is "The Story of an Hour" considered feminist literature

    To come up with a thesis statement about how "The Story of an Hour" is considered feminist literature, you should consider how Louise Mallard's emotional oppression and reaction to her subsequent ...

  13. The Theme of Freedom in The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin

    In the "Story of an Hour" Kate Chopin presents the theme of unrealized freedom but not until it is too late in the literary devices if characterization and irony. Say no to plagiarism. Get a tailor-made essay on ... The introduction provides sufficient background for the topic and has a strong thesis statement. The body has been divided ...

  14. Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"

    Introduction. This paper will provide a summary and an analysis of "The Story of an Hour," a short story by Kate Chopin published in 1894. Despite being only several pages long, the passage has become popular among readers. The title refers to the fact that the plot revolves around a woman and what she experiences throughout one hour.

  15. Sample Thesis Statements For The Story of An Hour

    The document discusses writing a thesis statement for Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour". It notes that crafting an effective thesis for this complex work requires careful analysis of its themes of freedom, identity, and the constraints of marriage. It then introduces HelpWriting.net as a service that provides customized thesis statements for students, written by expert literary ...

  16. Thesis Statement On The Story of An Hour

    This document discusses crafting an effective thesis statement for Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour." It notes that analyzing this complex story and its themes requires a deep understanding of the text. Creating a thesis statement that encapsulates Louise Mallard's psyche and Chopin's exploration of freedom, identity, and marriage is a challenging but important task. Seeking ...

  17. What is the theme of "The Story of an Hour"?

    A thesis statement for Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour" could focus an essay on the feminist theme found within the story. Though some readers find Louise Mallard's epiphany in the wake of her ...

  18. Analysis of "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin Research Paper

    Hu, Aihua. "The Art of Repetition in 'The Story of an Hour'." A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, 2020, pp. 1-6. Jassam, Aseel Hatif, and Hadeel Hatif Jassam. "Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour": A Feminist Discourse of a Married Woman Reclaiming Her Lost Female Identity."

  19. Thesis of A Story of An Hour

    This document discusses the challenges students face in crafting a thesis statement for Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour." Developing a thesis for this complex story requires a deep understanding of its symbolism, themes, and the author's intentions. Additionally, formulating a clear and concise thesis that conveys the intended argument can be difficult. The document recommends ...

  20. Thesis Statement For The Short Story Of An Hour

    Thesis Statement For The Short Story Of An Hour. Satisfactory Essays. 326 Words. 2 Pages. Open Document. I do believe that the thesis statement also covers the theme of the story. This story has many themes with meanings that are could change our point of view on how we look on situations that may seem harmless, but actually are.

  21. What is a good thesis statement for analyzing irony in "The Story of an

    Get an answer for 'What is a good thesis statement for analyzing irony in "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin?' and find homework help for other The Story of an Hour questions at eNotes ...

  22. Fools Look at Chewy's Roaring Kitty Experience

    If you look at historical multiples, that means if they sell it four times that revenue in 2029, you've got to double from here on out, but what a ridiculous looking statement on the face of things.

  23. Thesis Statement Examples For The Story of An Hour

    The document provides guidance on writing a thesis statement for an analysis of Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour." It discusses that crafting a thesis statement requires carefully considering the complex themes in the story and articulating a concise single sentence that encapsulates the main argument. It notes that struggling students can find help from services that specialize ...

  24. The Story of an Hour

    For example, a viable thesis statement might be something like the following: "Although gender roles within marriages do vary, Chopin's story is a solid insight into how marriages of the time ...