The 3 Rules of Addressing Your Cover Letter in 2023

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You’ve finally sat down to write that cover letter (good for you!), but immediately you run into a roadblock: How do you even start the darn thing? Who do you address it to? Should you use Mr. or Ms.? Do you include a first name? And what if you’ve searched high and low, but can’t find the hiring manager’s name? 

Don’t fret! Follow these three rules for cover letter salutation salvation.

Rule #1: Address your cover letter to the hiring manager using a formal, full-name salutation (if possible).

For a cover letter, you should always default to addressing it to the hiring manager for the position you’re applying to. Unless you know for sure that the culture of the company is more casual, use the hiring manager’s first and last name. You can include a title, such as “Mr.” or “Ms.” (never Mrs. or Miss). But if you aren’t crystal clear on whether to use “Mr.” or “Ms.” and can’t find their pronouns with a little Google and social media searching (and you don’t have an easy way out with a “Dr.”), just drop the title. Omitting it is infinitely better than accidentally misgendering someone .

Most letters I see still use the “Dear” greeting, though I’ve seen a growing trend of people dropping it and starting with “Hello” or just the name. Any of these works. The most important part is having the actual name . Never use “ To Whom it May Concern ” or “Dear or Sir or Madam”—nothing could be more generic (not to mention archaic). Your cover letter could be the first opportunity you have to make an impression on the hiring manager, so make sure you show that you did your research .

For example, you can address your cover letter by saying:

  • Dear Ms. Jacklyn O’Connell,
  • Hello Mr. Kevin Chen,
  • Dear Niko Adamos,
  • Hello Jean Butler,
  • Tiana Richards,

Rule #2: If you don’t know the hiring manager, guess.

Sometimes, even after hours of online searching ( try these tips ), you still might not be able to definitively figure out who exactly the hiring manager for the position you’re applying for is—and that’s OK.

If you can only find a list of the company’s executive team, use the head of the department for the position you’re applying for. In the end, no one will fault you for addressing the letter higher up than necessary. This approach is definitely better than not using a name in your cover letter, because it still shows the time and effort you took to find out who the department head is.

Rule #3: Be as specific as possible.

So you’ve done your due diligence and after an exhaustive search—nothing. You just can’t find a single name to address your cover letter to. If that’s the case, don’t worry. The company is likely privately held with no reason to share who its employees are—and, more importantly, is aware of this.

If this is the case and you don’t have a name to use, try to still be as specific as possible in your greeting. Consider using “Senior Analyst Hiring Manager” or “Research Manager Search Committee”—something that shows that you’ve written this letter with a particular audience in mind and aren’t just sending the same generic letter for every job opening.

For example:

  • Dear Software Developer Search Committee,
  • Hello XYZ Co Marketing Team,
  • Dear Junior Accountant Hiring Manager,

Ultimately, you want your cover letter to convey your interest in the position. To start off on the right note, make your salutation as specific as possible—ideally with the name of the hiring manager. Of course, that can’t always happen, but as long as the effort is clearly made, you’ll be showing whoever reads your cover letter that you’ve put time into your application and are truly excited about the opportunity. 

Regina Borsellino contributed writing, reporting, and/or advice to this article.

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How to Address a Cover Letter to Recruiter or Hiring Manager

5 min read · Updated on November 24, 2021

Lisa Tynan

Knowing how to effectively address a cover letter makes you a very visible and appealing candidate.

Did you know that the cardinal rule of cover letters is personalization? It impresses a hiring manager or recruiter because it tells them you took time to research the specific information for the letter rather than sending a generic version.

What many people forget, however, is that the greeting or salutation in a cover letter must also be personalized with the hiring professional's first and last name whenever possible.

There are several effective ways to find the hiring manager's name for your greeting — and some acceptable back-up strategies when you can't. Either way, knowing how to address a cover letter effectively can prevent you from ending your hiring chances before they even begin. 

When you know the hiring manager's name

More often than not, you'll be given the name of the hiring professional or the manager that you'll work for. Whoever it is, use their full name (first and last name) in the greeting. 

If you cannot definitively tell the gender of the hiring person, do not use a gender-based title such as “Mr.” or “Ms.” in the greeting. Instead just use the person's full name.

For example, Alex Johnson could be male or female. To avoid a gender mistake, use Dear Alex Johnson, Hello Alex Johnson, or simply Alex Johnson .

However, professional titles such as “Professor” or “Dr.” are definitely acceptable as a cover letter salutation and should be used as a sign of respect. Be on the lookout for these and other titles to include.

How to find a hiring manager's name for your cover letter

If you're not given the name of the hiring manager, here are some effective ways to discover their name by using:

The job description: Check this document for the hiring manager's name. While it's not generally listed, you never know. If it's not obvious, there's also a trick to quickly discover an email in the job description that might contain the name; while in the document, press Ctrl +F or run Command + F and search for the @ symbol.

An email address: If you discover an email address, it may not have a full name but rather a first initial and last name or just a first name like [email protected] or [email protected] . A Google search combining the person's name as shown in the email and the company name might find you the person's full name.

 A LinkedIn post: A name connected to the LinkedIn job posting is probably that of the hiring professional who posted it, so use that name in your greeting.

The supervisor's title: It's more likely that a job description will list who the new hire will report to — such as the director of accounting — without listing a name. In this case, there are several search options:

Search the company's website for listings of staff members by title.

Run an advanced LinkedIn or Google search for all directors of accounting at that specific company.

Check with your network for someone who might know the person's name or search the appropriate professional networking sites.

Contact the company by phone or email. Tell them you're applying for [job title] and want to address your cover letter to the right person.

In the end, this research can be the difference between making a great first impression and getting noticed for the position — or getting totally ignored by the hiring manager. 

Acceptable options in lieu of a name

If you try the steps above and come up empty, there are still some alternative greeting options that will put you in a professional light.

The idea is to show that you've read the job description and tailored your greeting based on the company department where the job is located, the hiring manager's title, or the team with which you'll potentially work.

Some good examples include:

Dear Head of Design

Hello IT Department

Dear Accounting Manager

To Company ABC Recruiter/Hiring Professional

Hello Marketing Hiring Team

Dear Customer Support Hiring Group

Dear Human Resources

If you still can't find any specific name or department information, go with “Dear Hiring Manager.” It sounds professional and it's not gender-specific. In fact, a recent survey of over 2000 companies by Saddleback College showed that 40 percent preferred “Dear Hiring Manager” as the best greeting when a manager's name can't be found. 

“Dear Sir or Madam” is another option that works because it's gender-neutral and respectful. However, it sounds a bit old-fashioned and may signal a hiring professional that you're an older worker or just not aware of other greeting options. It's perfectly acceptable, but the better choice is “Dear Hiring Manager.” 

In the end, an actual name or any of the alternative examples will let you stand out from the crowd, so do your best to find and use those whenever you can.

Never leave the greeting blank

Whatever information you may or may not find, it's important to never leave your greeting line blank.

A blank greeting line can make you come across as lazy or rude, or imply that you simply don't understand how to write a cover letter — all of which will immediately put you out of contention for the job. There's no reason to leave the greeting blank when there are so many options that can be used effectively.

When you spend the time and effort to personalize your cover letter, you don't want to come across as “just another candidate” by using a generic greeting or no greeting at all.

A personalized greeting will impress any hiring professional, increasing the chance they'll read your entire cover letter — and ask you for an interview.

Not sure if your cover letter is cutting it? Our writers don't just help you with your resume . 

Recommended Reading:

Do Hiring Managers Actually Read Cover Letters?

5 Things to Say in Your Cover Letter If You Want to Get the Job

How To Write a Cover Letter (With Example)

Related Articles:

How to Create a Resume With No Education

From Bland to Beautiful: How We Made This Professional's Resume Shine

See how your resume stacks up.

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How to Address a Cover Letter When Applying for a Job

While addressing your cover letter may seem like a small part of your job application, your salutation may be the first thing an employer reads on your application. An appropriate opening can leave a good first impression and set the tone for a successful application that engages the interest of an employer. This article explains how to address a cover letter depending on the information available to you about the job you are applying for.

Who should you address a cover letter to?

While you may not be certain who will read your cover letter when applying for jobs, there are a few best practices for addressing a cover letter. Unless a job description includes information on a different person to send application materials to, you should address your cover letter to the hiring manager for the position. ‘Dear Hiring Manager’ is an appropriate greeting for situations when you don’t know the hiring manager’s name, but seeking out details about the team you would be working with shows that you have a strong interest in the company and pay attention to details.

Methods for finding the hiring manager’s name

The following methods can help you find the hiring manager’s name when applying for a new job:

Check the application materials

Sometimes a job posting or other application materials have the name and title of the person reviewing your application listed. Many companies include information about who to contact in order to streamline the job search process, so read the job listing carefully for any instruction on who to address your letter to. Look at email addresses or social media profiles linked to the posting and see if the hiring manager’s name is listed. If you previously communicated with someone at the company about your application, consider reaching out and asking who you should address your cover letter to.  

Look at the company website 

Some companies keep a list of key employees or even a full directory of their employees available on their website. They may have a separate careers page with information on a hiring manager, or you may be able to find the name of a human resources representative for your position. Look for who the managers are for the department are applying to work with and determine who would work most closely with your position. You can also search for the company online and find outside information on their hiring structure.

Call the business

You can call the front office of a company and ask for the name of the contact person for the position you are applying for.  Be sure to call during business hours and be as specific as possible so that you get the name of the correct person. If you are still not able to confirm the name of a contact, the company will likely expect applicants to use the name of their hiring manager’s position or even leave off the greeting entirely.

How to address a cover letter

Use these steps as a guide toward addressing your cover letter:

1. First, verify your information

Once you have the name or title of the person receiving your cover letter, make sure that all of your information is accurate. Do a quick search to see if they have any honorifics such as Dr. or Prof. that you can include in your greeting Avoid using gendered language such as ‘Mr.’ or ‘Ms.’ unless you have confirmed that they prefer to be addressed by that term.

2. Second, choose a salutation

Including a salutation is optional and based on personal preference. One option for beginning your cover letter is to simply list the name of the hiring manager followed by a comma. ‘Dear’ followed by their name and a comma is also a professional way to open your greeting. You should avoid less casual greetings such as ‘hey’ and ‘hello.’

3. Third, use a consistent format

When addressing your cover letter, use the same font and style as the rest of your application materials. Your greeting should be above the body of your letter and below a header that includes your name and contact information. Use consistent spacing before and after the greeting to make the letter easier to read for the hiring manager while devoting most of the page to the content of your letter.

4. Lastly, proofread

Every time you send out a cover letter, proofread every part of it including the address. Proofreading can help you avoid accidentally sending one company a cover letter with another company’s hiring manager listed in the greeting. Confirm the spelling of any names or titles and have another person check your work for typos. You should also make sure that you are using proper capitalization for their name and title.

Template for how to address a cover letter

Here is a brief template you can use when crafting a new cover letter or adding to an existing one:

[First name] [Last name] [Address] [City, State ZIP code] [Email] [Phone number]

Dear [Honorific]. [First name] [Last name],

Examples of how to address a cover letter

These are all examples of an acceptable greeting for a cover letter:

  • Dear Hiring Manager,
  • Dr. Alison Choudary,
  • Dear Human Resources Manager,
  • Dear Revolve Marketing Team,
  • Dear Prof. Rivera,
  • Dear Sierra, 
  • Ms. Cleo Thet,

Regardless of whether you can find the name of the hiring manager or not, you can still include a professional greeting when addressing your cover letter. While the way you address your cover letter will not likely convince someone to hire you, a greeting with dated or unprofessional language can easily discourage a hiring manager from taking your application seriously. You can use only a first name or add a salutation and honorific depending on your preference. 

Tips for addressing a cover letter

Use these tips to make sure your greeting is relevant and appropriate to the position:

  • Avoid phrases like ‘to whom it may concern’ or any other excessively formal language when possible.
  • Consider addressing the team you will be working with as a group if you do not have the name of your contact for the job.
  • If you have already communicated with the hiring manager, look at their email signature to see how they prefer to be addressed. For example, if the hiring manager signs their emails as ‘Mr. Dunlap,’ that is an indication that you should call him that as opposed to his full name.
  • When writing your cover letter or adapting it for a new position, make sure that every section including the greeting is professional and purposeful.

StandOut CV

How to address a cover letter | with examples

Andrew Fennell photo

The way you start your cover letter counts.

It’s the first thing a hiring manager sees when they open your application so you need to make them excited to peek into your CV .

In our guide, we’ll show you the ropes on how to address your cover letter, and even teach you how to find the recruiter or hiring manager’s name for maximum impact.

CV templates 

Address the hiring manager or recruiter directly

How to address a cover letter

Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name to start building a rapport with them.

Something simple like, “Hi Lucy” will do the trick.

According to recent research , simply seeing your own name can trigger a strong response in the brain. So, be sure to do this, to captivate the recruiter’s attention.

CV builder

How to find the recruiter or hiring manager’s name

You may be wondering, “How do I figure out their name?”

There are several ways to find out the name of the person handling the job opening, which we’ll look at below.

Recruiter's name in job advert

When you’re reading a job advert, you’ll sometimes find the name and email address of the person you need to get in touch with directly in the ad.

Look out for the section that says “For enquiries” or “Contact person”.

For example, the advert might say something like:

“For more info, please contact Susan Wright at [email protected].”

Usually, this person manages that job vacancy.

If you see this information, it’s your lucky day – job adverts are the simplest way to find the correct name.

Company website

Recruiter's name on website

If you can’t find the recruiter’s name on the job advert , and you’re applying for a job directly via a company, check out their website.

Keep an eye out for a “Who We Are” , “About Us” or “Our Team” section.

Here, you’ll usually be able to find the info about the people who work there, including the head of the department or hiring team connected to the position you’re applying for.

Look at the people’s profiles to get the one that fits your job’s department.

If you have trouble finding it directly, use the search bar on the company’s website and type in “Head of [Department Name]” or “HR Manager”.

You could also run a Google search for “[Company name] + team” for a quick way of finding an About Page for a particular team or department.

LinkedIn is one of the best ways to find a hiring manager or recruiter because millions of them are registered on the platform.

Firstly, ascertain the company that posted the position and the team it’s connected with from the information provided in the job advert.

When you know the department and organisation, head over to LinkedIn . Here, you can use the search bar to look for the company name, department or job title associated with the job opening.

Let’s say you’re applying for a marketing vacancy at Tesco. You can search for “Marketing Manager” in the search bar like this:

Recruiter's name on LinkedIn

Once the search results appear, click the “People” filter button to narrow down your findings further so that you’re only seeing people (and not companies or groups).

LinkedIn people filter

Then make sure you choose your target company under “Current Company” – this ensures you only view people who are current employees.

You will need to type the name of the company into the text box like this:

LinkedIn current company filter

Click on the name of the company you typed in. In this case, it’s “Tesco.”

Then hit the blue “Show results” button.

LinkedIn show results button

And examine the profiles that come up.

LinkedIn profiles

You’ll be able to find the person handling the job applications by looking for titles such as “recruitment manager” or “team leader” .

And once you view their profiles you may even be able to get hold of their phone number or email address.

Contact info

Here is how you can find a person’s email address via the contact details, if they have entered them.

Click on their profile then seek out the “Contact info” section.

This sits under their profile picture and headline.

LinkedIn contact info

If the user has made their contact info visible, you’ll see it here.

LinkedIn user email address

About section

Often, you can locate additional contact info, such as email addresses, in the “About” or “Summary” section of their profile.

To do this, scroll down to the user’s “About” section.

If the user has decided to include their email address, you’ll see it here.

LinkedIn about section

If you can’t find an email, you can contact them directly through LinkedIn.

Here’s how you’d do this:

  • Send a connection request – Send the person a connection request and a message. When they accept your request, you’ll be able to write an accompanying message.
  • Use InMail – If this specific individual isn’t in your network, use the LinkedIn InMail. This is a premium feature which lets you send messages to LinkedIn members outside of your network – it’s useful but do. Of course, there is a fee to use this feature but it’s a useful tool.

What if you can’t find a name?

Addressing cover letter if you can't find a name

Don’t panic if you can’t find the name of the individual you’re trying to address. This will happen a lot during your job search .

In such cases, it’s absolutely fine to begin with a friendly “Hi.”

But don’t use expressions like “Dear Sir or Madam” – this sounds extremely outdated and aloof.

If you use the word “Hi”, this ensures your cover letter is more amicable and modern , even when you’re unsure of the person’s name.

This is a courteous and simple way to start if you have difficulty locating the specific hiring manager’s name.

How to write a cover letter email subject line

Cover letter email subject line

A recruiter’s inbox gets flooded with applications, so when you write your cover letter email , your initial goal is to entice them to read your email.

You must catch their attention with a compelling subject line and give a captivating reason for them to click on your message.

Avoid using generic subject lines, such as:

  • “Check This Out” – Subject lines like this sound spammy, and hiring managers may ignore it.
  • “Important” – Recruiters won’t know why your email is important – they might deem it clickbait.
  • “CV Attached” – This subject line doesn’t offer any context or engage the recruiter in any way at all.
  • “Hire Me” – This comes across as too blunt and provides no context.
  • “I Need a Job” – This sounds too direct and may sound a little too desperate.
  • “Looking for Work” – While you’re being upfront, this isn’t an engaging subject line.

Instead of including any of these generic subject lines, you must promote your selling points right off the bat.

For instance, use subject lines that highlight your skills and expertise in a concise, screen-friendly title.

Determine your main strengths as an applicant and invent a way to integrate them into your subject line.

You could say something like:

  • “Veteran Graphic Designer with a Portfolio of Projects”
  • “Registered Nurse with Intensive Care Unit Expertise”
  • “Committed Secondary School Teacher with 10 Years’ Classroom Expertise”
  • “Certified IT Professional with Experience in Network Security”

These subject lines are effective because they communicate key information and value to hiring managers clearly and concisely. Each tells the recruiter about your qualifications and expertise and is tailored to the specific job or field.

A recruiter is more likely to open an email from someone who can potentially meet their requirements.

A quick tip: Remember, subject lines have a limited amount of space – you’ll probably only be able to squeeze in between 30 and 35 characters.

How not to address a cover letter

When you’re addressing your cover letter , some things simply aren’t worth including. These old-fashioned or overly formal ways of starting a cover letter can make a negative first impression.

So, avoid the below phrases in your cover letter greeting:

  • “Dear Sir or Madam” – This is far too old-fashioned and doesn’t show much effort. It’s also fairly impersonal.
  • “What’s up, [Department Name]?” – This is excessively informal and will probably give hiring managers the wrong impression about you. It also doesn’t address the specific person.

Steer clear of these unimpressive ways to address your cover letter and plump for a more personal, engaging approach, like “Hi James” or “Hello Sarah”. Don’t forget, you need to get the perfect balance of friendliness and professionalism.

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How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

how to address application letter

Options for Addressing a Cover Letter

  • Letter Without a Contact Person
  • Non-Gender-Specific Names

What Title to Use

  • Address an Email Cover Letter
  • Review a Sample Cover Letter

Before You Send Your Letter

One of the trickiest parts of writing a cover letter comes at the very beginning. Much of the time, you won’t know exactly who will read your letter. How do you address your cover letter when you don’t have the contact person’s name and/or gender ?

First of all, try to find out the name of the contact person. Some employers will think poorly of an applicant who does not take the time to learn the hiring manager’s name. Also, take care not to assume that you know the gender of the recipient based on the name. Many names are gender-neutral, and some hiring managers may identify as a gender other than male or female.

It’s also possible that you’ll do your research and still be unable to figure out to whom you are addressing your letter. In that case, it's better to be safe and use a generic greeting . It's also acceptable to start a letter without a greeting and start with the first paragraph of your letter .

You have a lot of options when addressing your letter. Learn more about the possibilities before you make your choice.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Contact Person

There are a variety of general cover letter salutations you can use to address your letter. These general cover letter salutations do not require you to know the name of the hiring manager.

In a survey of more than 2,000 companies, Saddleback College found that employers preferred the following greetings:  

  • Dear Sir/Madam (27%)
  • To Whom It May Concern  (17%)
  • Dear Human Resources Director (6%)
  • Leave it blank (8%)

Do keep in mind that terms like "To Whom It May Concern" may seem dated, so the best options may be either to use "Dear Hiring Manager" or not to include a greeting at all. Simply start with the first paragraph of your letter.

How to Address a Cover Letter for a Non-Gender-Specific Name

If you do have a name but aren't sure of the person's gender, one option is to include both the first name and the last name in your salutation, without a title that reveals gender:

  • Dear Sydney Doe
  • Dear Taylor Smith
  • Dear Jamie Brown

With these types of gender-ambiguous names,  LinkedIn  can be a helpful resource. Since many people include a photo with their profile, a simple search of the person's name and company within LinkedIn could potentially turn up the contact's photograph.

Again, you can also check the company website or call the company’s administrative assistant to get more information as well.

Even if you know the name and gender of the person to whom you are writing, think carefully about what title you will use in your salutation.

For example, if the person is a doctor or holds a Ph.D., you might want to address your letter to “Dr. Lastname” rather than “Ms. Lastname” or “Mr. Lastname.” Other titles might be “Prof.,” “Rev.,” or “Sgt.,” among others.

When you address a letter to a female employer, use the title “Ms.” unless you know for certain that she prefers another title (such as “Miss” or “Mrs.”).

“Ms.” is a general title that does not denote marital status, so it works for any female employer.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

Hiring managers get a lot of emails each day. Make it easy for them to scan your email and follow up by including a clear subject line and a signature with your contact information. It's important to address the email cover letter correctly, including the name of the person hiring for the position if you have a contact, to ensure that your letter gets noticed.

Subject Line of Email Message

Never leave the subject line blank. There is a good chance that if a hiring manager receives an email with no subject line, they’ll delete it without even bothering to open it, or it could end up in their spam mailbox. Instead, write a clear subject indicating your intentions.

List the job you are applying for in the  subject line of your email message , so the employer knows what job you are interested in. They may be hiring for multiple positions, and you will want them to identify the position you’re interested in easily.

How to Address the Contact Person

There are a variety of  cover letter salutations  you can use to address your email message. If you have a contact person at the company, address the letter to Ms. or Mr. Lastname. If you aren’t given a contact person, check to see if you can  determine the email recipient's name .

If you can’t find a contact person at the company, you can either leave off the salutation from your cover letter and  start with the first paragraph  of your letter or use a  general salutation .

How to Format the Salutation

Once you have chosen a salutation, follow it with a colon or comma, a space, and then start the first paragraph of your letter. For example:

Dear Hiring Manager:

First paragraph of the letter.

Body of Email Cover Letter

The body of your cover letter  lets the employer know what position you are applying for, and why the employer should select you for an interview. This is where you'll sell yourself as a candidate. Review the job posting and include examples of your attributes that closely match the ones they are looking for.

When you're sending an  email cover letter , it's important to follow the employer's instructions on how to submit your cover letter and resume.

Make sure that your email cover letters are as well-written as any other documents you send.

If you have attached your resume, mention this as part of your conclusion. Then finish your cover letter by thanking the employer for considering you for the position. Include information on how you will follow up. Include a closing, then list your name and your  email signature .

Your email signature should include your name, full address, phone number, email address, and  LinkedIn Profile URL  (if you have one) so it is easy for hiring managers to get in touch.

Firstname Lastname  Street Address  (optional) City, State Zip Code  Email  Phone  LinkedIn

Sample Cover Letter

This is a cover letter example. Download the cover letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

Sample Cover Letter (Text Version)

Mary Garcia 12 Rogers Avenue Townville, New Hampshire 03060 555-555-5555 mary.garcia@email.com

February 17, 2021

Franklin Lee

CBI Industries 39 Main Street Townville, New Hampshire 03060

Dear Mr. Lee:

I was excited to see your ad for the operations assistant position in your Townville offices.

I have five years of experience as an operations assistant/associate. In my most recent role at ABC Corp., I fulfilled orders, resolved customer issues, ordered supplies, and prepared reports. In previous roles, I’ve done bookkeeping, data entry, and sales support. Basically, anything your department needs to run smoothly, I can do – and most likely, I already have experience doing it.

My other skills include:

  • Strong communication skills, in person, in writing, and on the phone
  • Excellent attention to detail and organization skills
  • Top-notch customer service
  • Experience in the industry and passion for the product
  • Adept at all the usual professional software, including Microsoft Office Suite

I’ve included my resume for your review. Please contact me if you have questions or would like to schedule an interview. Thank you for your consideration.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Mary Garcia

Review Cover Letter Samples: It’s hard to write cover letters from scratch. To make life easier – and to make sure you don’t forget any of those pesky formatting rules —start by reviewing cover letter samples . Sending an email version instead? Look at a few examples of email cover letters to get started.

Customize Your Cover Letter: Why personalize your cover letter every time you apply for a job? Because even similar job titles have different requirements. The goal of a cover letter is to show the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for this particular job. Customizing your cover letter will help you emphasize your skills and experience and how they fit with the job requirements .

Spell-Check Names: Before sending your cover letter, make absolutely sure that you have spelled the hiring manager’s name correctly. That is the kind of small error that can cost you a job interview.

Carefully Proofread Your Letter: Whether you're sending an email or uploading or attaching a printable cover letter, it's important to make sure that your cover letter and resume are written as well as any other business correspondence. If you can, have a friend proofread before you hit send, to pick up any typos or grammatical errors.

Saddleback College. " Your Resume is Your 1st Interview ," Page 14. Accessed Feb. 17, 2021.

How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024

Background Image

Yes, how you address your cover letter matters.

After all, this is the first thing the recruiter reads when going through your cover letter, and yes, there is a right and wrong way to do it.

In this article, we’re going to teach you how to address your cover letter in such a way that you leave a positive impression on any recruiter!

  • How to address a cover letter to a recruiter? (Casual or formal)
  • What title to use when addressing the hiring manager
  • How to address a cover letter without a contact person/to a company
  • How to address a cover letter without an address
  • How to address a cover letter in an email

How to Address a Cover Letter To a Recruiter (Casual or Formal)?

As we already mentioned, the way you address your cover letter is important because it is the very first thing recruiters see upon opening your cover letter. 

A well-formulated cover letter address means that you care enough to research the company (i.e. to find the hiring manager’s name and title) and that you show attention to detail. 

As such, you should always put some research into who you’re addressing your cover letter to and do so in a formal way.  

And yes, the formal part is important too. The recruiter isn’t your best friend - you want to maintain a sense of professionalism.

If this is how you address the recruiter in your cover letter:

  • What’s up Hiring Manager
  • Hi there Hiring Team

Then you say goodbye to the job.

Now, you’re probably wondering, how can I find out whom to address my cover letter to?

That’s what we’re about to teach you:

Who Am I Addressing My Cover Letter To?

Here are some tricks to find the full name of the hiring manager: 

  • Check the job listing. The job listing may have information about the recruiter or the department doing the hiring. Make sure to read through the entire job listing, as it might not be at an entirely obvious place.
  • Check the company website. Some websites feature the names of the hiring managers or heads of departments that may go through your cover letter. Alternatively, LinkedIn is another place where you can look for this information.
  • Check the company’s LinkedIn. You can look up who works in the company you’re applying for on their LinkedIn page.
  • Ask around. Do you have friends that work for the company? They could provide you with valuable inside info.

To avoid making a bad impression, head over to our guide on cover letter mistakes to learn about what NOT to do when writing your cover letter.  

job search masterclass novoresume

Addressing a Cover Letter With a Name

By now, you have probably found the hiring manager’s full name and gender. With this information available, it’s best to address the hiring manager formally, as follows: 

  • Dear Mr. Brown,
  • Dear Miss Fitzpatrick,
  • Dear Mrs. Lockhart,
  • Dear Ms. Walters,

If, for some reason, you are unsure about the person’s title, gender, marital status, or preferred pronouns, just address them using their entire name to avoid any mistakes. For example:

  • Dear Alex Brown, 
  • Dear Blair Fitzpatrick,
  • Dear Jesse Lockhart,
  • Dear Madison Walters,

Addressing someone with a title 

Now, if you found out that the hiring manager has a professional or academic title, then it’s more appropriate to address them using that title. If, for example, the hiring manager has a Ph.D., then it’s more respectful to address them as “Dr. Last Name,” instead of “Mr. Last Name.”  

Here are some professional titles and how they’re abbreviated: 

  • A professor is Prof. 
  • A reverend is Rev. 
  • A sergeant is Sgt. 
  • Honorable is Hon. 

If, however, you are uncertain about how a title is abbreviated, then avoid it altogether. 

Here are a few examples to give you an idea: 

  • Dear Prof. Welsch,
  • Dear Director Smith,
  • Dear Rev. Owen,

Dear Dr. Leonard,

When addressing women and you don’t know their marital status, always go with Ms., because it doesn’t comment on marital status. Some women prefer not to be addressed with Miss or Mrs. even when they’re married, so sticking with Ms. is the best choice. 

Want to learn more cover letter tips ? Our guide has all you need to ace your cover letter!  

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Contact Person

It might happen that, no matter how hard you search, you can’t find the name of the hiring manager or department head that will read your cover letter.

In that case, you can address your cover letter to the department, faculty, or the company.

  • Dear Software Development Hiring Team,
  • Dear Customer Service Department Hiring Team,
  • Dear Head of the Literature Faculty,
  • Dear Director of Marketing,
  • Dear Human Resources Recruitment Team,

Alternatively, if you don’t have enough information either about the department or the team, you can opt for addressing the cover letter directly to the company’s hiring staff, as follows: 

Dear [Company Name] Hiring Team 

Dear [Company Name] Recruiting Staff

If all else fails (meaning, you don’t know the name of the department head or even the exact department, in addition to the recruiter) then you can use one of the good, old-fashioned:

Dear Hiring Manager,

...but NOT the impersonal and way outdated “To whom it may concern” and “Dear Sir/Madam.” 

Starting a cover letter can be challenging. Our guide can show you how to start a cover letter that will get you results from the get-go. 

How to Format the Company’s Address

Before you reach the salutation, you have to make sure that the header with the recipient’s contact information is formatted correctly. 

It might not be the deciding point of whether you’ll secure an interview or not, but it will cost you points if it’s off. 

So, the first thing you want to do is add your name and surname on the upper left side of the cover letter. Underneath, you should write your professional title (if applicable), your email , and your phone number . 

Now, after you’ve also added the date, you should leave one more space and add the recipient’s contact information and, most importantly, the company’s address. 

It should look something like this on your cover letter: 

how to address a cover letter

When You Can’t Find the Company’s Address 

Some companies might have several addresses listed (as per their branches, for example), or even none at all. 

Since an application that doesn’t have an address line could end up lost or misplaced, make sure you do one of the following before skipping the company’s address completely:

  • Check all your resources, (pretty much like when you were looking for the hiring manager’s name) to find the company’s address. 
  • Use the company’s headquarter address. This is sometimes easier to find, especially if the company has several branches. 
  • Use the P.O. Box number for the company. This is not as specific as an actual address line, but if all else fails, it’s still something. 

Frequently, you’ll be asked to submit your job application (including your cover letter) electronically, or by email. In those cases, you can skip the address line altogether. 

Here’s how you’d go about addressing a cover letter in an email.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

If you’re sending your job application through email, chances are you’ll need to format your cover letter in the body of the email, or as an attachment along with your resume.

First and foremost when you’re addressing a cover letter in an email is the subject line, which should be between 6-10 words long. 

Considering that hiring managers receive countless emails daily, you want to make sure that yours is a job application immediately. And the way to do that is straight through the subject line, which should indicate exactly the position you’re applying for and your name so that it’s easier to find through the recruiter’s swarmed mailbox. 

Here’ what we mean by that:

  • Subject Line:   John Doe - Software Development Job Application 
  • Subject Line: John Doe - Job Application for Marketing Manager Position   
  • Subject Line: John Doe - Stock Manager Job Application 

Afterward, if you’re including your cover letter in the body of the email (as opposed to attaching it as a document), begin by using a salutation, add space, and start your letter. 

If someone referred you for the position, make sure to mention that in the subject line of your email as well as in your opening paragraph.  

So, let’s see how all the above plays out in practice: 

Subject Line: John Doe - Carl Jacob’s Referral for Software Developer

I was very glad that Mr. Jacobs, a long-time partner at your firm who also happens to be my mentor from college, referred me for the Software Developer position. 

Do you want your style, personality, and overall personal brand to shine through your application? With Novorésumé, you can match your cover letter with your resume to make a lasting impression! 

matching resume and cover letter

Key Takeaways 

And that’s all there is when it comes to addressing a cover letter! You should feel much more confident in doing so by now. 

Either way, let’s go over the main points we covered throughout the article: 

  • Your cover letter address should be formal and well-researched. Don’t address the hiring manager with “hey,” “what’s up,” “hi there,” or even the old-fashioned “Dear Sir/Madam” and “To Whom It May Concern.”
  • Always try to find the hiring manager’s full name and professional title through the company’s website, LinkedIn, by calling, or by asking someone who works there.
  • If you know the hiring manager’s name, go with “Dear Mr./Miss Last Name,” but if you’re unsure about their gender, marital status, or preferred pronoun, just address them using their full name.
  • If the recruiter has a professional or academic title, it’s more appropriate to address them using their title.
  • If you can’t find the contact person’s name, then address the department, faculty, or company (i.e. Dear Microsoft Hiring Team , or Dear Software Development Recruitment Team ).

Related Readings: 

  • Do I Need a Cover Letter in 2024
  • Entry-Level Cover Letter
  • Cover Letter for Internship
  • How to Write a Cover Letter in 2024

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How to Address a Cover Letter: From Heading to Date to Salutation + More

We’ll discuss how to address a cover letter with examples, and then we’ll look at specific parts of each cover letter address area in detail..

Christian Eilers

Writing a cover letter might be one of those things that make you want to bang your head on your keyboard.

Fortunately, though, addressing a cover letter is a piece of cake (we’ll help you with the other bits in a different article).

In this short article, we’ll walk you through how to address a cover letter effectively and easily, with examples, and then we’ll guide you through the specific parts of each cover letter address area in more detail.

Let’s get to it!

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How to Address a Cover Letter

Here’s an example of how to address a cover letter:

Your First & Last Name Your Address Line 1 Your Address Line 2 January 1, 2021 Jessica Schwartz Human Resources Manager Name of Prospective Company Prospective Company Address Line 1 Prospective Company Address Line 2 Dear Jessica:

And there you have it! 

As you can see from the cover letter address sample above, it’s really quite simple. Feel free to copy and paste that into your cover letter opening and tweak to your needs!

Next, we’ll go into detail about each of the various subsections of the cover letter address area.

Related Read : 10+ Cover Letter Tips & Tricks Sure to Score Interviews

Structure of a Cover Letter Address Section

1. cover letter heading (sender’s information).

At the very top of your cover letter, in what’s called the cover letter header, you’ll place your contact details. 

As we showed you above, it’s quite simple:

Your First & Last Name Your Address Line 1 Your Address Line 2

If you want, you can include your phone number or email address, as well.

Cover letters follow a business letter or formal letter format, but, you don’t have to necessarily stick to the styling of the example above. If you have a stylized heading with your name and contact details from your resume contact information section, feel free to use the same heading here!

However, for the remainder of the cover letter, stick as close to the business letter format as possible.

2. The Date

The entirety of addressing a cover letter is quite simple, and that’s true for the date as well.

Here’s how to add a date on a cover letter:

January 31, 2022

Just remember to leave a line break space both above and below the date to keep things looking neat and organized.

Related Read : Career Glossary: 45+ Job Terms, HR Vocab & Employment Words to Know

3. Inside Address (Recipient’s Information)

After the date, it’s time to add the recipient’s information, also known in formal letter writing as the “inside address.”

As we showed you above, here’s how to write the company’s info:

Jessica Schwartz Human Resources Manager Name of Prospective Company Prospective Company Address Line 1 Prospective Company Address Line 2

We start with the name of the person you are addressing the cover letter to, usually the HR manager or hiring supervisor, followed by their official title at the company. Do your best to find someone’s name so it is tailored by researching the company and its LinkedIn profile.

If you still can’t find someone’s name, simply put “Hiring Manager” or “ATTN: Hiring Manager” above the company name and address.

4. Salutation

The last part of the cover letter address section before reaching the body is the salutation. 

And here’s how simple that is:

Dear Jessica:

Easy as that! 

You can tweak that a bit, if you prefer not to use “dear,” for example. You could also choose to use their last name (“Dear Ms. Schwartz”) or their full name. However, in most cases, I think the first name is most powerful (and we’re in the 2020s now, as well).

Finally, use a colon after the name and you’re through!

Related Read : Resume Sections: 10+ Things to Include on a Resume to Land Interviews

Well, that’s it for our guide on how to address a cover letter, and we hope it helps answer all your questions about addressing cover letters right. Got any further questions or feedback about how to format the address on a cover letter? Let us know below in the comments, and thanks for reading!

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thank you for this article, Goodwall! It’s easy, simple, and so useful for me, because I search for a job right now and have to send out many cover letters. Wish me luck 🙂

Thanks for your comment, Anastasia, and for stopping by! I’m so happy if it helped, and I wish you the best of luck on your job search!

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To Whom it May Concern? How to Address and End a Cover Letter

We’ve put together a few tips to help you personalize your cover letter, whether you know the hiring manager’s name or not.

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Customers Interviewed by:

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In our modern age of personalization, To Whom It May Concern is both an antiquated and detached way to address a cover letter . It may also imply that you haven’t researched the company or that you assume the letter can be read by anyone. Below, we’ve put together a few tips to help you personalize your cover letter , whether you know the hiring manager’s name or not.

When it comes to addressing a cover letter, advice columns frequently spotlight these two pitfalls:

  • Mistake 1 : Failing to address your cover letter to a specific person
  • Mistake 2 : Addressing a cover letter to the wrong person

Most job postings don’t specify who will be reading your cover letter. This puts job seekers in a tricky situation. Fixing the first mistake could cause you to make the second. So what’s the best way to replace “To Whom It May Concern” on your cover letter?

Get instant feedback on your cover letter with Jobscan’s cover letter optimization tool. See it in action .

3 Key Tips for Addressing Your Cover Letter

1) don’t address your cover letter to the recruiter.

For many job openings, the first person you need to impress is a corporate recruiter. That doesn’t mean you should address your cover letter to them.

“Recruiters do not read cover letters,” a long-time healthcare recruiter told Jobscan . “Bottom line.”

That might be an overstatement — most don’t, some do — but many recruiters would admit that they aren’t the intended audience of a cover letter. “It’s mostly for the hiring manager,” said a recruiter in the non-profit industry. “For us [recruiters], it’s just an extra step in an already elongated process.”

The healthcare recruiter agreed: “If you’re sending it straight to a hiring manager who’s looking at a much lower number of applicants, they might actually read that.”

2) Search for the Hiring Manager’s Name

The best way to personalize your cover letter is to address the hiring manager by name. However, it can be difficult to identify the hiring manager, and your educated guess could cause you to address your cover letter to the wrong person. Here are some tips for finding the hiring manager.

Search the Company Website

Few job postings list the hiring manager by name but many will tell you the position to which you’d be reporting.

Addressing a cover letter: Use "reports to" to figure out who to address.

With this information, a little detective work can reveal the name of the hiring manager.

Start off by browsing the company’s website. Look for an about page, company directory, or contact page. These pages are frequently linked at the very bottom of the website. Companies that feature employees on their about page make it much easier to figure out who will be reading your cover letter.

Addressing a cover letter: Find the hiring manager on these types of pages.

You can also try searching the website. If the website doesn’t have a built-in search bar, use this syntax in Google:

“[position you’ll be reporting to]” site:company website

Addressing a cover letter: Use google to search for the hiring manager's name

This will reveal hard-to-find about pages or other mentions of the position in the company’s blog posts, press releases, and other pages.

Search LinkedIn

If a company doesn’t list the hiring manager on their website, LinkedIn is your next best resource.

Start off by searching for the company page on LinkedIn. Once you’re on the company’s LinkedIn page, click “See all X employees on LinkedIn” near the top.

Addressing a cover letter: Find the hiring manager on LinkedIn. See all employees on LinkedIn

Depending on the company size, you can either browse all positions or narrow your results by adding search terms to the search bar (e.g. “Marketing Manager”) and utilizing the “Current companies” filters on the right side of the screen.

Addressing a Cover Letter: Use LinkedIn filters to find the hiring manager's name

Search for the “reports to” position from the job listing. If it wasn’t provided in the listing, search for keywords related to your prospective department (e.g. “marketing”). If the company uses an intuitive corporate hierarchy  you should be able to determine who will be reading the cover letter.

Contact the Company Directly

There is nothing wrong with calling or emailing the company to ask for the name of the hiring manager. Be polite and honest with the administrative assistant or customer service representative. Explain that you’re about to apply for a job and you’d like to know who you should address in your cover letter.

If they aren’t able to provide an answer or transfer you to someone who knows, let it go. The last thing you need is word getting back to the hiring manager that you were pushy with one of their colleagues.

3) Use a More Personalized “To Whom it May Concern” Alternative

You can still personalize your cover letter, even when you don’t know the identity of the hiring manager. Instead of “To Whom It May Concern,” which casts a wide net and is specific to no one, try addressing your cover letter to one specific person.

The most generic version of this is:

Dear Hiring Manager,

But job seekers can often be more specific. Take a look at these examples:

Dear Customer Experience Manager, 

Dear Customer Experience Hiring Team Manager, 

Some other alternatives include addressing your cover letter to an entire department:

  • Dear Engineering Department,

Dear Engineering Team, 

OR addressing the entire team:

Hi Jobscan Team,

Dear Jobscan Team,

As with many aspects of the job application process, demonstrating that you put in some extra effort can make a difference. Doing some research before addressing a cover letter contributes to a positive first impression.

8 cover letter salutation examples

Here are eight standard cover letter openings you can choose from. Select the one that best suits the energy of the company you’re applying to and use either a specific name or department depending on the information you have available.

  • Hi Mr. Smith,
  • Hello Jobscan Team,
  • Dear Ms. Whittaker and Team,
  • Good morning, Mr. Kennedy
  • Good afternoon, Louise, 
  • To the Jobscan hiring manager, 

How to end a cover letter

Just as important as beginning your cover letter is ensuring you end it on a strong note. Your cover letter ending should not be underestimated in its ability to help you move forward in the hiring process. After making your case in the previous paragraphs, you need to end your cover letter with a strong call to action to entice the recruiter to invite you for a job interview.

Madeline Mann , an HR leader in the technology industry and creator of Self Made Millennial , says that while no conclusion will save a bad cover letter, it can distinguish you from another good candidate.

It’s all about enthusiasm, according to Madeline. “Companies want people who want them,” she says. If you can draw to the company’s values and show how interested in working with them you are, that’s a substantial advantage. You want to create a lasting impression by incorporating that enthusiasm in your cover letter ending.

“Companies want people who want them” – Madeline mann

A good conclusion, in fact, should reflect the rest of your cover letter.

Set up the end of your cover letter with a strategic middle section

If you want your cover letter ending to be effective, you first need to build momentum. Most recruiters and career coaches agree that by the time you get to the end of your cover letter, it needs to possess the following three elements:

  • It tells a story about yourself
  • It shows your value concretely
  • It calls the recruiter to action

Julia Reiter, a career coach based in Toronto, suggests that you lead up to your cover letter ending by showing that you understand the company’s current challenges and are equipped to solve them. This will make your cover letter call to action all the more effective.

Although the job description will give you information about what the company is looking to accomplish, it will not help you distinguish yourself from other applicants. Show the company you are willing to go the extra mile by researching the key industry challenges and the particular issues they might be facing (beyond the obvious ones).

For example, you can read articles from industry-related publications and get acquainted with the numbers and statistics about the particular business areas your company is engaged in. By being aware of the particular issues they are facing, you can more easily make your skillset and experiences relevant.

When you talk about your past experiences and accomplishments , make sure you mention the problems the company is facing. For example, if you are applying for a customer success manager position at a Software-as-a-Service company, a relevant issue might be high churn rates.

Instead of writing something like “my experience in customer success makes me confident I will be a great addition to your team,” write something like “When I worked at XYZ company, I was able to reduce the churn rate by 30%. With this experience and my deep knowledge of B2B consumer psychology, I am prepared to ensure we have one of the lowest churn rates in XYZ industry.”

End your letter with a call to action

You may be tempted to write that “I’m looking forward to hearing from you” for your cover letter ending. That isn’t a call to action. For Madeline, the end of a cover letter serves to give one last push and show interest and enthusiasm in a way that stands out.

Likewise, Julia says, “now that the company knows you are aware of their current challenges and are equipped to solve those challenges for them, don’t leave them hanging. Tell them how they can make your skills and experiences a reality on their team. What number can they reach you at for an interview?”

How do you conclude a cover letter? Here are 3 examples

  • “I’m excited to have the opportunity to talk about how I could join your team in its quest for XYZ value. I’m particularly thrilled about XYZ project and would love to know how I can contribute to it.
  • “I am keen on meeting with you to see what I can contribute to XYZ company as it moves on in its journey to XYZ goal. I am available at your convenience for a phone call or in-person meeting.”
  • “I would love to get your thoughts on what I mentioned. I am happy to hop on a phone call at your earliest convenience to discuss how I can help XYZ company with XYZ issue.”

Read more : Check out our cover letter examples page, which covers a wide range of jobs, industries, and situations.

Mistakes to avoid when ending a cover letter

The mistakes people make when they end their cover letter are often the same ones they made earlier in the piece. However, they can be particularly detrimental to your chances of landing an interview if they constitute the final impression a recruiter has of you.

When ending a cover letter, avoid:

Making it about yourself instead of the company: use sentence constructions that make the recruiter see how the company is going to benefit from hiring you. For example, try to use “you” or “we” instead of “I.”

Sounding generic or robotic: we’ve all seen these cover letters that end with the same plain paragraph. If you write one of those, the last impression you’re giving is not different from those given by all other applicants.

Selling yourself short: the conclusion is your last chance to show off the value you can bring to the company. Emphasize it and use it as a segue into your call to action.

How to end a cover letter with the appropriate salutations

Always remember that recruiters review hundreds of applications for each position. When you are competing with that many candidates, the slightest mistake will disqualify you immediately Although you may not think too much of the salutations, they can hurt your chance of landing an interview.

Make sure your salutations are formal and polite. You should be respectful not only by indicating your appreciation of the recruiter’s time but also by being concise. Do not overdo your salutations and do not employ informal greetings. “Sincerely,” “Thank you for your consideration,” “kind regards,” are all safe options.

When ending your cover letter, you want to balance confidence, respect, and appreciation.

17 cover letter ending examples

Depending on the energy of the business you are applying to, and your own personality, select one of the following 17 cover letter closing options.

  • Best wishes,
  • Sincere thanks,
  • Many thanks,
  • Thanks in advance,
  • Thank you for your consideration,
  • Thank you for your time,
  • Respectfully, 
  • Sincerely, 
  • Sincerely yours, 
  • Yours truly, 
  • Kind regards,
  • With best regards,
  • Looking forward to speaking with you, 
  • With gratitude,

One Final Important note: Cover letters aren’t what they say they are

Cover letters don’t introduce your resume, they supplement it.

In order to get your cover letter into the hands of a hiring manager who cares, your  resume has to get past the recruiter and, in many cases, the applicant tracking system they’re using.

Try analyzing your resume below to receive instant optimization tips and recruiter insights from Jobscan so that the time you spend crafting your cover letter isn’t a waste.

The keyword analysis also shows exactly what to focus on in your cover letter.

Jobscan Premium (one month free)  even has a cover letter scan feature.

Editor’s Note: A section of this article was originally written in a separate blog post by Léandre Larouche on June 9, 2020. It has been updated and combined with this article as of June 10, 2021.

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How to address a cover letter?

I'm sure that you had to create a cover letter at some point in your job search. And like most other job seekers, you probably came across this problem: "How to address a cover letter?"

Most of the time, you have no idea who is going to read the cover letter.

So, how to address a cover letter without a name?

Hiring managers get roughly 100-200 resumes every day. And, they are already under a lot of pressure to sort the resumes.

On top of that, if they get cover letters that do not have proper formatting and do not address the hiring manager in the cover letter header, mark my words; they will surely throw your resume away.

In a resume cover letter, minute details make or break your chance of being hired.

So, you need to make sure that you know how to address cover letter correctly.

Don't worry!

In this blog, we will tell you everything you need to know about:

  • Who to address cover letter to?
  • How to address a cover letter without a name?
  • How to find out who to address a cover letter to?
  • How to address an email cover letter?
  • How to address a cover letter for internal position?
  • What should you not do when addressing a cover letter?
  • Example of Proper Cover letter address format?
  • Some common question about how to address cover letter

Who to Address a Cover Letter To?

Ideally, you need to address your cover letter to hiring managers , not the recruiters .

In many job postings, the name or email address of the hiring manager is given.

If you are lucky enough to find such job listings, then you are sorted. You can write a personalized cover letter addressing the hiring manager directly.

Unfortunately, not many job listing sites give the name and email address of the contact person.

Do not quit and send the cover letter without a name.

Go to the company website/about page and see if it has the list of staff.

That way, you can probably get the hiring manager's name or someone from the talent acquisition department to whom you need to address your cover letter.

The critical aspect is to do a lot of research .

Suppose you still don't find any name or contact information of anyone in the hiring department. In that case, you can also address your cover letter to someone in authority in other departments, such as the senior manager or the head of the department you are applying for.

It is a hundred times better to address your cover letter to someone in the organization than not addressing it at all.

At least, this way, they will understand that you are not throwing rocks in the dark. You have done your research and have good ideas about the organization.

Also Read: How to write a stellar cover letter in 2022?

How to Address a Cover letter Without a Name?

There are plenty of generic cover letter salutations you can use in your cover letter. These generic cover letter salutations eliminate the need to know the name of the contact person.

The only drawback is that you have no option to personalize your cover letter.

A survey conducted by Saddleback College has seen that only 8% of hiring managers are ok with a cover letter without name. But 92% of hiring managers prefer to have some address in the cover letter.

  • Dear Hiring Manager (40%)
  • Dear Sir/Madam (27%)
  • To Whom It May Concern (17%)
  • Dear Human Resources Director (6%)

However, we don't recommend you to use to whom it may concern in your cover letter address.

Instead, the best general salutation can be "Dear Hiring Manager."

If you want to personalize the address, you can address your cover letter to the specific department you are applying for. For example, "Dear Digital Marketing Department."

How to Address Cover Letter When You Don't Know Hiring Manager's Gender?

There will be times when you will find the gender-neutral name of the hiring manager. In that case, altogether avoid using gender-specific cover letter addresses. Instead, address with their both name and last name in the salutation like this:

  • Dear John Doe,
  • Dear Charlie Brown ,
  • Dear Taylor Paisley,
Hiration Pro Tip : In this type of gender-neutral name, you can search for the person on Linkedin to find out their gender. Alternatively, you can search on the company page or call the company reception to get more information about the hiring manager.

How to Address Cover Letter When You Know Hiring Manager's Gender?

If you know the hiring manager's gender, things will be much easier for you. For men, you can address the hiring manager with "Mr.," but things get a bit tricky for female hiring managers.

Imagine this,

You have addressed the hiring manager with "Miss.," and if she turns out to be married, it will not look good on your part. You definitely do not want to offend your hiring manager.

Instead of "Miss" or "Mrs.," use " Ms.," which does not focus on their marital status.

  • Dear. Ms. Moore,
  • Dear Miss Jane,
  • Dear Mrs. Black,

Should You Address the Hiring Manager With Only Their First Name?

If you know the hiring manager personally, only then can you use their first name to address the cover letter. Else, address the letter with their full name.

How to Use Professional Titles When Addressing a Cover Letter?

If the hiring manager has a professional or academic title, don't forget to address them by their title. You can write the full title like this:

  • "Dear Doctor Taylor,"

Or you can use the abbreviated form like this:

  • Dear Dr. Taylor ,
  • Dear Sgt. Park,
  • Dear Prof. Hoverman,
  • Dear Principal Fury,

Also Read: How long should a cover letter be?

How Do You Find Out Who to Address a Cover Letter To?

If you don't find the hiring manager's name and contact information on the job description, don't just leave it like that! Do some research and put some effort into finding the name and email id of the hiring manager.

It may take some extra effort, but it shows that you are interested in this job. This section will tell you everything you need to know about finding the hiring manager's name and to who you address a cover letter.

Call the Company

Calling the company to ask for a hiring manager's details is the best way to accurately determine the hiring manager's name and number.

  • Call the company desk
  • State who you are and why you are calling
  • Tell that you are applying for a job position and confirm who the hiring manager is for addressing in the cover letter.
  • Most of the time, the hiring manager will happily give you the information you need.
Tip : When taking their name, ask for the spelling of the hiring manager's name. You do not want to screw up the spelling.

If the company desk refuses to give information for any reason, don't worry; we have four other ways in our arsenal.

Network With People Working With Prospective Employer

The second best way to get the hiring manager's name and contact information is to connect with your prospective employer's employees.

This way, you can ask your connection to refer you to the hiring manager or ask for the hiring manager's contact information when a job becomes available.

It is easier than you think.

Just do a quick Linkedin search and see the employers active on Linkedin.

Now, slowly start engaging with the person you want to connect with.

After a couple of days, send them a personalized connection request and slowly build a rapport.

You do not want to ask right out for reference after introducing yourself. Instead, add some value to the conversation, and show genuine interest in them.

This process takes some time, but the connection you will make with these people will take you a long way in your professional journey.

Read the Job Description Carefully

It is a sad truth that most job seekers do not read the job description carefully. In this way, they miss vital information and potentially the hiring manager's contact name and details.

Most of the job descriptions contain the email address of the hiring manager at the end. And you can easily find the name of the contact person with the email address.

Most professional email ids contain the name of the person and the company name. For example, [email protected] has two parts- Judy.M and hiraiton.com.

And if you search on Google by the first part of the email address "Judy.M" and the company name, there is a high chance that you will find the Linkedin profile of the respective person. And you can get to know other information about them as well.

Find Out Who Will Become Your Superior or Manager

Many job descriptions include the details about the reporting manager. In such cases, you need to address your cover letter to the reporting manager.

You can find more information about the reporting manager by a quick Linkedin search with the reporting manager's job title and the company.

If the company is larger, there may be multiple individuals with the same job title. In that case, you can further narrow down your search by location.

Do an Online Search

Another easy way to search for the hiring manager is by simply doing a Google search. Google will show you the most relevant results for your search query. Example: See in this example how the first result itself answered your question.

Example-Cover-letter-address

Also Read: How to address a cover letter without name?

How to Address a Email Cover Letter?

We live in a digital age now.

Nowadays, most candidates send email cover letters to the hiring managers. And hiring managers get 100s of email cover letters daily.

To stand out from these 100s of email cover letters, you need to make sure your email cover address is perfect.

1. Subject Line of Email Cover Letter

The first thing the hiring manager will see is your email cover letter subject line. So, never leave the subject line blank.

Hiring managers sort the email cover letters by the job title. And if your cover letter does not have a subject line, it will not show in the hiring manager's list.

Here is an example cover letter subject line :

Subject line: Job Application for Video Editor Position, Ref: Hanna Moore

2. Address the Cover Letter in the Correct Way

The rules of a formal cover letter and an email cover letter salutation are similar. You can refer to the previous section of this blog to know more about it. Here is an example of an email cover letter address

  • "Dear Mr. Doe,"

Note : Recent trends have seen many job seekers do not include "Dear" in the salutation. You can do that too. There is nothing wrong with it.

Also Read: How to start a cover letter for maximum impact?

How to Address a Cover Letter for Internal Position?

If you address the cover letter to higher management or hiring manager, always use their name to address in the cover letter.

luckily, since it's an internal position, you can easily find the name of the person by asking your colleagues.

What Not to Do When Addressing a Cover Letter

Even if you did everything right on your resume and cover letter, starting it wrong may cost you a chance to get a call for an interview.

Let's see what you should not do when addressing a cover letter.

Do Not Address the Cover Letter to the Recruiter

" Recruiters do not read cover letters. "

Recruiters only sort the resumes by keywords and forward the same to the hiring managers.

This is the golden rule you need to keep in mind when addressing a cover letter. Always address the cover letter to the hiring manager.

Do Not Address the Cover Letter to an Ex. Hiring Manager

Company websites do not get updated regularly. If a hiring manager leaves the company, you may still find their name and contact information on the website or other third-party websites. So, be extra careful when addressing a cover letter.

Spelling the Hiring Manager or Company Name Wrong

Do not sabotage your first impression by making a spelling mistake on the hiring manager's name or the company name. It demonstrates a lack of attention to detail.

Do Not Start With a Bland Greeting

Avoid using to whom it may concern cover letter address. It is very generic and shows utter laziness on your part. It projects that you did not put much effort into writing the cover letter.

Example of a Cover Letter Address Format

Here is an example of a proper cover letter address format:

Cover-letter-address

Frequently Asked Questions

How to address a cover letter to a large company.

If you have to address a cover letter to a large company, and you don't know the hiring manager's name, you can always address the cover letter to the department you are applying job to. For example:

  • Dear Finance Department
  • Dear Marketing Team
  • Dear Customer Service Department

Can I get creative with my cover letter address?

There is no restriction on being creative with addressing a cover letter. It is essential to research and understand who your audience is and if he/she will appreciate your creativity.

For example, if you do something creative with your cover letter salutation to apply in a creative field, it will get the hiring manager's attention.

On the other hand, if you apply for a technical position, you might hold off from showing your creativity on the cover letter address.

Should a cover letter address the company location?

It is a traditional practice to include the company address in the cover letter. Primary because it is a formal document, it would be better to add the company address before starting your cover letter.

Should a cover letter header include the candidate's address?

The candidate's address is an essential part of the cover letter. If not the whole address, at least City, Country should be mentioned in the cover letter. Example:

  • "Pine Bluff, AR"

This helps the hiring manager sort the candidates based on location.

Also, the Application Tracking Softwares sort the resumes and cover letters based on their locations. And if your location is not mentioned in the cover letter, it might get unnoticed by the ATS software.

Should a cover letter header, and resume header be the same?

Ideally, your cover letter header should be the name of the role you are applying for. And resume heading should be your current job title. For example, if you are currently working as a data analyst, your Resume headline should be something like:

  • "Jr. Data Analyst."

And you are applying for a Data Scientist position, then your cover letter heading should be,

  • "Data Scientist"

There is no hard and fast rule, but this is the approach we at Hiration follow, and it has been working for our clients.

You can also write the same heading for the cover letter and resume if you like. It has some added advantages. If the cover letter gets misplaced, it will be a lot easier to trace it back to the resume.

How to write the intro to a cover letter?

If you want to hook the hiring manager to read your cover letter, you need to write a professional intro explaining why you are applying and what role you are applying for.

You need to remember that hiring managers are often dealing with recruitment for more than one position. And it will help them if you specifically mention what role you are applying for.

Key Takeaways

With that, we have come to the end of this blog. By now, you should get all of your questions answered. But still, if you have any questions regarding how to address a cover letter and who to address a cover letter, let's go over the key takeaways of the blog:

  • Do not send the cover letter without addressing someone.
  • If you do not know who to address, call the company desk or go to LinkedIn to search the hiring manager's name.
  • If you do not know the name, you can address the cover letter with "Dear Hiring Manager,"
  • Alternatively, you can address the cover letter to the head of the department you are applying for. For example: "Dear Sr. Marketing Manager,"
  • Make sure to use accurate professional and academic titles with the name of hiring managers.
  • Do not use "To whom it may concern." It is old-fashioned and does not impress the hiring manager nowadays.

Go to Hiration career platform which has 24/7 chat support and get professional assistance with all your job & career-related queries. You can also write to us at [email protected] and we will make sure to reach out to you as soon as possible.

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WTO / Letters and Emails / Cover Letters / How to Properly Address a Cover Letter (with Examples)

How to Properly Address a Cover Letter (with Examples)

A cover letter is an official one-page document you submit as part of your job application alongside your resume or curriculum vitae.

The main aim of writing this letter is to highlight your professional background to the hiring manager or potential employer.

A well-written cover letter can spark the prospective recruiter’s interest and get them to read your other job application materials. However, a poorly formatted letter might mean that your job application documents will be disregarded, and you want to make sure this does not happen. As such, before you start writing this letter, you must have adequate information on how to draft an effective cover letter, starting with how to address the letter correctly.

How you address your cover letter is very important, as this is usually the first thing the hiring manager reads when going through it. A well-formulated cover letter address shows your enthusiasm for the job and demonstrates your attention to detail skills.

This is because it will be specific (i.e., include the hiring manager’s name and title), indicating that you took your time researching the company and the cover letter recipient. Moreover, addressing your letter properly sets the tone for the rest of your letter, making your job application stand out.

Free Templates

Free Format of Addressing a Cover Letter 01 for Word

How to Address a Cover Letter Properly

Knowing how to address your cover letter professionally and appropriately will enable you to make a positive impression on the recruiter reviewing your letter, increasing your prospects of getting more job interviews and ultimately landing the position you were hoping to secure.

The following are different methods of addressing the situation, depending on the situation:

Addressing a cover letter with no name

The most appropriate way of addressing this letter is to use a formal salutation addressed directly to the recruiter or hiring manager using their full names. However, in some cases, research into the company and whom to address the cover letter to may not disclose the recruiter’s name. In such a situation, you can explore alternative methods of addressing the letter that do not negatively impact your chances of getting a job interview.

These include:

Use academic or professional title

Using the recipient’s right academic or professional title is considered an excellent greeting option. It demonstrates that you read the job description and tailor your greeting based on the company department where the job position is currently available, the hiring manager’s title, or the team with which you will potentially work. Nonetheless, you will need to be as specific as possible to demonstrate that you have done your research and aren’t just sending a generic cover letter to many recruiters from different companies hoping to land a position in either of the companies. 

Examples of professional greetings in such a scenario include:

  • Dear Customer Support Hiring Manager/Team, in the event you are applying for a customer service representative position
  • Dear Chief Financial Officer/Accounting Manager, if you are applying for an accounting position
  • Dear Talent Acquisition Team
  • Dear Human Resources Manager, among others.
  • No salutation

If you cannot find the recipient’s name, do not know the recipient’s professional or academic title, and are unsure of the department where the job is currently available, you can opt to skip the salutation and start your cover letter with the introductory paragraph. This is advisable, as it avoids the chance of making things worse. However, it is essential to note that this should be considered a last resort, as not including a salutation may come across as being rude, overly lazy, or implying that you do not know how to write this letter, all of which may put you out of contention for the job.

Use “dear hiring manager”

If you cannot find any specific name or sufficient department information, use the “dear hiring manager” salutation, as it sounds professional and is gender-neutral. Some applicants like to use “Dear Sir/Madam” as a generic salutation for cover letters, but its use is a bit old-fashioned. In addition, it may be considered overly formal by some employers. The “To Whom It May Concern” greeting is also discouraged as it sounds too impersonal and outdated.

Other options

The most common and acceptable way to address a cover letter when the letter’s recipient is unknown is by using the ‘Dear Hiring Manager” greeting.

Still, you can use other alternative greetings, including:

  • Dear IT Department
  • Dear Company ABC Hiring Manager/Recruiter
  • Dear Head of Nursing
  • Dear Company XYZ Team
  • To the Catering Department, etc

Addressing using a formal full name

Generally, most job descriptions or job postings will provide the name of the hiring professional or the manager you will be working for. In such cases, it is preferable to address your cover letter formally using the hiring professional’s first and last name. Addressing your letter using the recipient’s formal full name establishes a personal connection and sets the right tone for your letter.

  • Dear John Doe
  • Dear Alexis Brown
  • Dear Johnson Kingstone

Using gender-specific titles such as Mr., Ms., or Mrs. is only advisable if you are sure of the receiver’s gender and marital status. Suppose you know the hiring professional personally and they have told you their preference; you can use their title and last name when addressing the cover letter.

  • Dear Mrs. Patterson
  • Dear Mr. Stanley
  • Dear Ms. Rodríguez

Given that your contact has a professional title that you are aware of, you may want to replace the gender-specific titles such as Mr. or Mrs. with the receiver’s professional title or honorifics, as this is considered more respectful. For example, if the letter’s addressee is an individual with a medical or doctorate degree, you will need to write Dr. before their name as a sign of respect.

More examples

  • Dear Prof. Hussein
  • Dear Rev. Purity Smith
  • Dear Lt. Angelou

Address using the only name for a non-gender-specific name

If you know the hiring officer’s name but cannot definitively tell their title, gender, marital status, or preferred pronouns, it is best to address them using only their full name to avoid any mistakes.

  • Dear Alex Brown
  • Dear Jamie Brown
  • Dear Mohamed Ahmed,
  • Dear Tiffany Hale

When addressing a cover letter, it is best to be as specific as possible and personalize it accordingly to impress the hiring professional and compel them to read the rest of your letter.

Including a specific name and title is always considered the best way to address a cover letter.

However, if your research efforts do not disclose the hiring manager’s name, you can still be as specific as possible and consider using the department or academic title, or address your letter in a more generalized manner but with a particular audience in mind.

How do You Find Out to Whom to Address a Cover Letter?

Most organizations provide the names of the hiring managers so that applicants immediately know to whom to address the letter.

However, in cases where you are not given the recruiter’s name, consider the following effective ways to discover whom to address your cover letter:

Double-check the job posting

The most convenient way to find out the name of the hiring professional is to double-check the job posting or job description. This is because most job descriptions contain comprehensive information on job application submission criteria, which generally include the letter’s receiver.

Examine the email address provided in the job description

If the hiring manager’s name is not included in the job description or is not apparent to you, you can discover the hiring manager’s name by examining the email address provided in the job description. For example, if the email address provided in the job description is [email protected], a Google search combining the person’s name as indicated in the email and the company name might find you the hiring manager’s full name. However, this may not always work, as some organizations prefer to use business emails.

Check LinkedIn

LinkedIn job postings often include the name of the person offering the job. LinkedIn’s profile name is more often than not the hiring manager’s name, and you should use that name in your address line.

Check the company website

Suppose the company you are applying to has an official company website. Then try to find the head of the relevant department on the company’s staff page or do a LinkedIn company search.

The supervisor’s title

In most cases, job descriptions list who the new hire will report to, such as the head/director of accounting, the director of nursing services, etc., without disclosing a specific name. In this case, there are various search options you can explore to find out the hiring manager’s name.

This includes running an advanced LinkedIn or Google search for all directors of accounting or nursing services in that company, checking with your network for someone who might have an idea of the person’s name, including your professional networks, or searching the company site for listings of staff members by title.

If all of the above-mentioned options fail, you can consider contacting the company by phone or email and telling them that you are applying for a specific job position. Still, there are chances that you may not find the contact person, and you would like to address your cover letter to the right person.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

If the company’s preferred job application submission criterion is through email, you will need to format your cover letter in the email’s body or as an attachment along with your resume. If you are formatting the letter in the email’s body, create a strong subject line that is clear and concise to enable the recipient to know the purpose of the email. Your subject line should include the job title you are applying for, your full name, and a phrase that reiterates what the email contains.

After providing a suitable subject line of 6–10 words long, include a professional and specific salutation. If you know the addressee’s name, address the letter to them using either their full name or “Mr.” or “Ms.” preceded by their full names. If the recipient has a professional or academic title, such as “Dr.” or “Prof.”, use that in place of Mr. or Mrs.

Subject Line: Job Application for Financial Analyst, Jessica Jones Dear Mr. John Doe, or Dear Dr. Vincent Hopkins,

If you are unable to determine the recipient’s name from the email provided or through a quick search, use a general salutation such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or leave out the salutation and begin your letter with the introductory paragraph.

Once you have selected a suitable salutation, follow it with a comma or colon, skip a line, and then start the first paragraph of your letter. This applies to letters sent via email or traditional mail.

Do’s and Don’ts for Addressing a Cover Letter Properly

These letters are formal; thus, they should always be addressed professionally and with a specific audience in mind to demonstrate an applicant’s professionalism and attention to detail.

Discussed below are the steps for addressing a cover letter:

Do some research to find the hiring manager’s name

Whenever possible, this letter should always be addressed to someone specifically in their official name. This makes the letter seem more personalized to the reader and helps differentiate you from other candidates. Therefore, do research and try to find the hiring manager’s name. However, if you can’t find the recruiter’s name, you may list the contact name as “Hiring Manager.”

Do read job descriptions for the hiring manager’s name

Double-checking the job description to find out the hiring manager’s name or whom you will report to if you are hired is very important as it shows your keenness and attentiveness skills, which most employers look for in potential employees.

Do customize your letter to the audience

If you research the company website and LinkedIn profiles, double-check the job description or email address, and you are still not able to find the letter recipient’s name, consider customizing your letter to a specific audience rather than a specific individual. You can address the letter to the department, faculty, the company, or the overall hiring manager.

Discussed below are the don’ts for addressing this letter:

Don’t use “to whom it may concern.”

While some applicants prefer to address their letter to ‘To Whom It May Concern” in cases where the department head, exact department, or recruiter’s name is unknown, it is greatly discouraged, as it is impersonal and outdated. 

Don’t use “Dear Sir or Madam.”

Using dear sir or madam as a greeting line in cover letters is also discouraged, as it is overly formal and old-fashioned. While it may seem logical to address an unknown recipient, it is impersonal and might not fit the specific company culture.

Don’t address a letter incorrectly

Knowing how to address your letter correctly makes you a very visible and appealing candidate to potential employers. On the other hand, addressing your letter incorrectly may create a negative picture of you in the hiring manager’s mind, thus reducing your chances of getting a job interview.

Don’t address using “Hello or hi.”

The address line of this letter should be written formally to maintain a sense of professionalism. Starting the salutation with greetings such as “hello,” “Hi,” and “hey” makes the tone of the letter informal, which is incorrect. Always consider starting your salutation with “Dear…” or simply writing the addressee’s full name.

Final Thoughts

Knowing how to address your cover letter properly can make the difference between your application being noticed and overlooked by hiring professionals. The most appropriate way to address it is by personalizing it for the recipient using their first and last names. There are various effective ways to find the recipient’s name, including double-checking the job description, examining the given email address, checking LinkedIn and the company website, or contacting the company via email or a phone call. However, if these targeted searches do not find you the hiring manager’s name, there are other acceptable strategies to address your letter in a more generalized but specific manner. Remember that “To Whom It May Concern” and “Dear Sir/Madam” are inappropriate salutations for a cover letter, as they are impersonal and outdated. 

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6 Examples: How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

By Status.net Editorial Team on December 25, 2023 — 11 minutes to read

Addressing the recipient without knowing their name might seem complicated, but there are ways to navigate this situation. Let’s take a look at a few strategies to make your cover letter feel personalized even when you don’t have a specific name to address.

Be Professional and Engaging

Using general salutations like “To Whom It May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam” can make your cover letter feel impersonal. Instead, opt for a more engaging opener such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear [Company Name] Team.” This type of greeting acknowledges the company and shows that you have researched the team you are addressing.

Focus on the Position and Company

Make sure to tailor the content of your cover letter to the job you are applying for by highlighting relevant qualifications, experience, and skills. Share specific examples of your successes that align with the responsibilities of the position. Mention the company’s values, goals, or recent successes to demonstrate how your values align with theirs. This can effectively showcase your interest and commitment to the role.

Use LinkedIn and Company Website Research

If you cannot find the hiring manager’s name in the job posting, you can turn to LinkedIn or the company website for clues. Search for professionals working in human resources or hiring roles at the company. If you find a specific contact, address your letter to that person while using their full name and title. Otherwise, continue with a professional and engaging salutation as mentioned earlier.

Here are two examples of how to start a cover letter without a name:

Dear Hiring Manager, As a passionate marketer with five years of experience, I am excited to apply for the Marketing Manager position at (…) Company. Achieving a 30% increase in leads generated through my previous campaigns, I am eager to contribute to the growth of your marketing department.
Dear ABC Inc. Team, With a strong background in project management and a proven track record of implementing cost-saving strategies, I am confident in my ability to excel as the Senior Project Manager at ABC Inc. Your company’s commitment to sustainable practices aligns with my values and I am thrilled to be considered for this opportunity.

By applying these strategies, you can create an impactful and personalized cover letter, even without knowing the recipient’s name. This attention to detail can set you apart from other applicants and leave a positive impression with your prospective employer.

How to Find the Hiring Manager’s Name

Sometimes locating the hiring manager’s name can be tricky, but there are several ways to find it. Let’s go through a few methods to help you address your cover letter without a name.

Using LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great resource for finding the hiring manager’s name. Here’s how you can use it:

  • Visit the company’s LinkedIn page.
  • Click on the “People” tab to browse through the employees.
  • Use the search bar and enter keywords such as “recruiter,” “hiring manager,” or the department you’re applying to.
  • Check the found profiles, and try to identify the right person responsible for hiring in your desired role.

Make sure to double-check that the person is currently working in the company to avoid using outdated information.

Checking Company Website

Another way to find the hiring manager’s name is by checking the company website:

  • Locate the “About Us” or “Team” page, where you might find a list of employees along with their titles and roles.
  • Look for a person who has a recruiting or hiring-related title within the department you’re targeting with your application.
  • If you cannot find the necessary information on the website, try checking a company’s press releases or blog. Sometimes they include names of important team members.

Making a Phone Call

When all else fails, you’re left with one more option – making a phone call.

  • Call the company’s main line and politely ask the receptionist for the name of the hiring manager or the person responsible for recruitment in the department you’re interested in.
  • Be prepared to provide the job title and a job reference number (if available) to help the receptionist find the right person.

Finding the hiring manager’s name isn’t always possible. If you cannot locate it, don’t worry. Addressing your cover letter as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” is still better than not sending a cover letter at all.

How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: Sample Phrases

Starting with job title.

When you cannot find the recipient’s name, use their job title to address the cover letter. This shows that you can connect and direct your message to the relevant person. Here are some examples:

  • Dear Hiring Manager, – This is a common and universally understood phrase for addressing a cover letter without a name.
  • Dear [Job Title], – Use the specific job position that the recipient holds, for instance, Dear Marketing Director .
  • To the [Job Title] Selection Committee, – This approach can be useful when applying for a role advertised by a team or committee that will handle the hiring process, such as To the Scholarship Selection Committee .

Referring to Department

Another approach is to address the cover letter to the department that the position is within. This helps to direct your message to the appropriate team or group. Here are some examples:

  • Dear [Department] Team, – Mention the department you are applying for, such as Dear HR Team, or Dear Sales Team .
  • Greetings, [Department] Department, – Use the department name to address the letter, like Greetings, IT Department .
  • To Whom It May Concern in the [Department], – This is a formal alternative when you don’t know the recipient or department’s name, for example, To Whom It May Concern in the Finance Department .

Using these approaches will ensure that your cover letter appears professional and well-directed, even when you don’t have the exact name of the recipient. Focus on the content and the skills you bring to the position to make the best impression on the reader.

Crafting Content for Cover Letters

When you’re unsure of the recipient’s name, you might feel a little lost on how to address your cover letter. Don’t worry. You can still create an engaging and professional cover letter that gets the job done. Here are some tips and examples to help you craft the perfect content for an anonymous cover letter.

Start with a professional, yet friendly, greeting. If you don’t know the hiring manager’s name, use a general opening line such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” . These greetings are widely accepted and show respect towards the person receiving the letter.

Next, dive into your strengths, skills, and achievements. Mention the qualifications that make you a strong candidate for the position. Share relevant accomplishments from your previous roles, such as leading a successful project or boosting sales. Be specific when describing your skills and use quantifiable results when possible. For example:

“During my time at Company (…), I managed a team of 10 and successfully increased sales by 25% within six months.”

Show enthusiasm for the job and demonstrate your knowledge of the company. Research the organization’s goals, values, and recent projects, then incorporate this information into your cover letter. This will help you tailor your letter to the company’s needs and show that you’d be a good fit for their culture. You could say something like:

“As a long-time admirer of your company’s commitment to sustainability, I’m excited about the opportunity to contribute to the upcoming eco-conscious product line.”

Close your cover letter with a strong call-to-action. Express your interest in further discussing your qualifications and offer your availability for an interview. Thank the hiring manager for considering your application and include your contact information. A sample closing paragraph could look like this:

“I’m eager to discuss how my expertise in digital marketing could contribute to the success of your team. Thank you for considering my application. You can reach me at (555) 555-5555 or [email protected] to schedule a conversation.”

Keep your cover letter concise and focused on your unique selling points. Even without knowing the recipient’s name, following these guidelines will allow you to create a memorable and attention-grabbing cover letter that leaves a lasting impression on potential employers.

Tips on Prefix Usage

When you’re addressing a cover letter without a specific name, it’s good to think about the appropriate prefix to use. Here are some tips to help you choose the right one:

First, consider using a general and gender-neutral prefix like Dear Hiring Manager . It will work well if you don’t know the recipient’s name or aren’t aware of their gender. This is a widely accepted way to address a cover letter without a specific name.

Dear Hiring Manager, I came across your job posting for a Graphic Designer, and I am excited to apply for the role.

If you happen to know the job title of the person who will read your cover letter, you can use it. This shows that you have put effort into researching the company and position.

Dear Marketing Director, I am writing to express my interest in the open Digital Marketing Specialist position at your company.

In some cases, you might know the name of the department that the job is in. In this case, you can address your cover letter to the entire department.

Dear Finance Team, I was thrilled to see an opening for a Financial Analyst at your company and would like to apply for the position.

When you’re unable to find any specific details or when addressing a larger company, you can opt for a broad salutation like To Whom It May Concern . Just be aware that it may come off as impersonal, so it’s best to use this as a last resort.

To Whom It May Concern, I am submitting my application for the Content Writer position posted on your careers website.

The key is to maintain a professional tone throughout your cover letter. Regardless of which prefix you choose, always customize your content to suit the specific job and company you’re applying to. By doing so, you demonstrate a genuine interest in the role and leave a positive impression on the hiring manager.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Sending a cover letter without addressing it to a specific person can be a pitfall. It might make the recipient feel unimportant or signal that you didn’t do your research. To make your application stand out, be mindful of these common mistakes:

  • Not being specific about the role: Your cover letter should not only address the person but also the specific role you’re applying for. Tailor your letter according to the job and the company. For instance, instead of writing “I wish to apply for the marketing position”, be more specific like “I am interested in applying for the Digital Marketing Specialist role at [CompanyName].”
  • Focusing too much on yourself: Although your achievements are important, the cover letter should focus on how your skills can benefit the company. Frame your accomplishments in a way that highlights the value you can bring to the organization.
  • Being overly formal or stiff: While it’s important to maintain a professional tone, being too formal might come across as insincere or impersonal. Use a friendly tone and avoid jargon or buzzwords to keep your cover letter genuine and relatable.
  • Spelling errors and typos: Even the smallest of typos can create a negative impression. Double-check your cover letter to make sure there are no mistakes. Keep an eye out for incorrect spellings, especially when addressing the recipient.

The goal of your cover letter is to make a personal connection and showcase how you are a great fit for the company. Taking the time to address your letter properly, proofread for errors, and customize your content demonstrates your attention to detail and commitment to the position.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can i properly address a cover letter when the recipient’s name is unknown.

If you don’t know the recipient’s name, consider using a general salutation instead. For example, “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear Recruitment Team” acknowledges the recipient without using a specific name. You can also research the company’s website or LinkedIn to try to find the appropriate contact person.

What alternatives are there to ‘To Whom It May Concern’?

There are several alternatives to ‘To Whom It May Concern’ that can help make your cover letter stand out:

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Company] Team
  • Dear [Department or Job Title] Hiring Team
  • Dear [Company] Recruitment Team

How do I determine the appropriate salutation for my cover letter?

To determine the right salutation for your cover letter, do a bit of research on the company or organization you’re targeting. This may help you uncover the specific department or hiring manager’s name. If not, use one of the general salutations mentioned earlier to address your cover letter in a more personalized manner.

What are examples of cover letter openings without using names?

Here are some examples of cover letter openings without using specific names:

  • “Dear Hiring Manager, I am excited to submit my application for the [Job Title] position at [Company].”
  • “Dear [Department or Job Title] Hiring Team, As a passionate professional with experience in [Industry], I am eager to contribute to [Company] as a [Job Title].”
  • “Dear [Company] Team, I recently came across the [Job Title] opening at [Company], and I am confident that my skills and experience make me a strong candidate.”

How can I avoid common mistakes when addressing cover letters without names?

To avoid mistakes when addressing cover letters without names, follow these tips:

  • Do thorough research on the company and the job posting
  • Be concise and professional in your language
  • Use an appropriate general salutation if you can’t find a specific name
  • Double-check for spelling and grammatical errors before sending the cover letter
  • Avoid using outdated or overused phrases, such as ‘To Whom It May Concern’ or ‘Dear Sir/Madam’

By following these guidelines, you can create a strong and effective cover letter that stands out to hiring managers, even if you don’t have a specific name to address.

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7 Essential Tips on How to Format a Cover Letter

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7 Essential Tips on How to Format a Cover Letter was originally published on Resume.io .

how to address application letter

When you come to writing one of the most important letters in your life, you may need a few ground rules to help you to get started with the format of your cover letter.

That blank page can look awfully daunting otherwise.

Here are some must-follow tips around the structure and content of your cover letter:

Well-designed header

The header section of the cover letter should be attractive and space efficient. Graduates might be tempted to select a header design that reduces the amount of space that they need to fill for their cover letter, but you will have more to say than you think.

The header should contain all essential contact details (in addition to those on your resume) – full name, email, and mobile. You don’t have to include your full address and you definitely don’t have to include the “inside address” of your employer.

Mouthwatering intro

The intro of a recent grad or early career cover letter should be far more than a “this is what I want out of my career.” The hiring manager understands that you want the job – applicants need to prove to them that they are worthy of it. Make a compelling case.

The cover letter introduction should lead with your most relevant accomplishment for the role in question, with a hint of personality around how you achieved it. Avoid a generic cover letter that you send to everyone – you might not have much experience, but you should still strive to be as selective as possible.

Only relevant career stories with context

The length and content of your cover letter should be dictated by the amount of relevant experience that you have to share. Do not feel that you need to fill a page by parroting the responsibilities of the role or long lists of skills and personality traits without evidence.

Empty space is better than empty words – employers will value quality over quantity for the early career professional. What they want to understand in the cover letter is that you understand the demands of the role and can justify why you think you will do a good job.

Conclusion with call-to-action

End the conclusion of the early-career cover letter with a final detail about your personality and motivation and share your interest in learning more about the role. Saying that you hope to have the opportunity of an interview to learn more about the role is a powerful call-to-action which demonstrates your belief in yourself. Remember to keep the tone hopeful.

After the raw content come the syntax and visual choices:

Powerful action verbs

When you only have a certain number of sentences to create a favorable impression, your choice of verb can have a surprising impact on how your messages are received. Insightful action verbs can add a new level of meaning. Did you “manage” or “orchestrate” a project?

A word of warning: sprinkle action verbs and other buzzwords liberally. The cover letter should read like a conversation starter, so ensure that it sounds natural enough.

Impactful fonts, sensible sizes, and shot paragraphs

Increasingly the font size to take up more space on the page will fool no one. Stick with a standard 10 or 12 size and choose a suitable professional font that is easy to read.

Use short 2-4-line non-indented paragraphs and leave a line between each one. Give the reader a natural break between each of your career stories and consider using bullet points for your greatest accomplishments (the ones that you can ideally quantify with numbers). The cover letter should be strictly no more than one page – ideally aim for 3/4 of a page.

Right choice of template

Finally, very few cover letters or resumes are send as a blank word document these days. There are a wide choice of resume and cover letter templates – it is a great idea to use the same visual look for both your cover letter and resume. When a hiring manager is viewing a large number of candidates, this association will stick in their minds.

There is a subtle art to writing a persuasive cover letter when you do not have experience.

Strike a balance between outlining hopes for the future and sharing the greatest hits from your past. Your future employer will want to understand both.

If you are curious to explore further (you should be), the following article from Resume.io provides substantial further food for thought: “ How to Format a Cover Letter in 2022: Examples and Tips ”

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how to address application letter

Letter: Catching rainwater runoff could help reduce need for tapping into groundwater

Don't let the recent rain totals fool you. A week of wind and weather doesn't alter the fact that Florida is always in a drought situation.

Much rainwater flows off the saturated ground into canals and waterways, and what is collected goes towards supporting an ever-increasing population growing by 1,000 people a day. That is why there is an ever-increasing coverage in the local press, which is important in helping explain this increasingly severe problem.

It isn't only we in South Florida who are experiencing low water levels and drought. Last fall, 40 days of low water in the Mississippi River stalled barge traffic and blocked river boat ports. The Panama Canal reduced boat traffic 40% as the result of a particularly dry year.

West Palm Beach is considering 30 new wells in the Floridan Aquifer to supplement the surface water supply, which was compromised in 2021 by an algae bloom in Clear Lake. This system to purge salt from the aquifer water with deep wells would also require wells to dispose of the salts and contaminants in the water at a cost yet to be determined.

All these indicators make clear the need for lessening the use of groundwater in our drinking water supply.

Florida ranks among the last five states for drinking water quality as rapid growth and pollution seeping into the groundwater continue to be a problem.

A solution to part of the problem could be as simple as that used in every island nation in the Caribbean and possibly worldwide: the addition of water-holding cisterns as part of every new construction project in the state, whether residential or commercial. The water contained in these concrete holding facilities is collected through runoff from roofs during rainy periods when it flows through gutters into downspouts and into the cisterns where it is available for watering crops, animals, lawns, driveways, the family dog, and possibly for human use as well.

It would be a great step forward in alleviating our water shortage if the state would mandate that water catchments are to be incorporated in all new construction — whether rooftop, underground, or as an adjoining structure.

Homeowners can also help by switching lawn sprinkling systems to "off" during long periods of rainy days.

The water crisis in South Florida particularly is commanding more awareness and should be a wakeup call for our municipalities and the city to work together to ensure that there is enough clean and available water to sustain our growing population.

The new biblical Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse replacing the original Conquest, War, Famine and Death should be Drought, Floods, Wildfires and Pollution. We should do everything possible to assure that we do not suffer the same fate by denying climate change and all its attendant evils.

Judy Schrafft, Palm Beach

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how to address application letter

Corrections officers to Whitmer: Mobilize National Guard to address prison staffing crisis

LANSING — The union representing Michigan corrections officers is calling on Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to mobilize the National Guard to help staff Michigan prisons they say are chronically understaffed and unsafe.

"I am formally requesting that you activate the Michigan National Guard to provide immediate custody support to prisons in dire need of it while we work directly with you to find realistic, permanent relief measures," Michigan Corrections Organization President Byron Osborn said in a Wednesday letter to Whitmer.

"Under your watch, state corrections officers continue to suffer unlike any other state employees ever have in the history of Michigan," Osborn said. "They are still being forced to work exhausting, demoralizing numbers of mandatory 16-hour overtime shifts per week. They are not being allowed to have a normal, healthy life with their families. None of your other state employees are being subjected to these conditions."

A Whitmer spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but the department put out a statement that said it has taken a series of steps to address the staffing shortage and "the solution is not a temporary measure such as bringing in National Guard members who have not been trained to operate in this environment."

Osborn, who has complained about understaffing and excess forced overtime for years, said half the state prisons have officer vacancy rates of 20% or higher, and five are operating at officer vacancy rates above 30%.

The final $2.1 billion Corrections Department budget for 2025, approved by the Legislature early Thursday morning, did not include language directing the MDOC to spend $12 million in unspent funds from the prior budget to pay for $1,500 signing bonuses and retention bonuses for corrections officers, as was recommended in the earlier version of the budget approved by the state House. The state used federal money to pay for $12 million in signing and retention bonuses this fiscal year. Also deleted from the final budget, though it was included earlier in both the House and Senate versions, was $16.5 million to allow certain corrections officers to join the state police hybrid pension plan — a move Osborn said would have significantly helped officer retention.

Now, "people are resigning in droves," Osborn told the Free Press on Wednesday.

"It's just a matter of time before someone gets seriously hurt or killed."

Members of the Michigan National Guard helped give vaccinations inside the prisons near the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, but have never been called on to assist with regular prison staffing, even during or after the 1981 rioting at prisons in Jackson, Ionia, and Marquette that injured about 100 prisoners and officers and destroyed or damaged about 30 prison buildings.

If approved to work in the prisons, members of the National Guard would not carry their rifles or other guns, Osborn said. Michigan corrections officers are not normally armed, though they have access to weapons, when needed.

Michigan houses about 33,000 prisoners in 26 state prisons. It has about 5,500 corrections officers for required staffing 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

In 2022, Osborn described Michigan prisons as "time bombs" because of chronic staffing shortages , overworked and exhausted corrections officers, and frustrated inmates. At that time, he told the Free Press he was considering asking Whitmer to activate the Michigan National Guard to assist with staffing, though he ultimately did not do so.

"This would be unprecedented," he said Wednesday.

At the time, Osborn said the department was about 1,000 officers short and losing about 1,000 officers a year to retirement and other departures, meaning plans in the 2023 budget to hire 800 new officers, even if achieved, would result in a staffing situation that continued to worsen.

The unsigned statement issued by the department said wage increases are among the measures approved in recent years to address the staffing shortage. Half the prisons are operating with officer vacancies below 15% and eight prisons have a vacancy rate of 5% or lower, the department said.

"The Department and other stakeholders need to remain focused on efforts that can stabilize staffing in the long-term, including promoting the benefits of a career in corrections," the MDOC statement said. "These include having an active role in keeping their communities safe, serving in a role that can change lives, and the ability to reach annual maximum pay of $68,500 after just 3 and a half years of service."

Osborn said in the letter to Whitmer that there is a significant gang problem in the prisons and violent incidents are worsening due to policy changes that have resulted in reduced use of solitary confinement.

"The conditions I’ve described to you are real," Osborn said in the letter. "If you are skeptical and wish to see for yourself, I’ll gladly escort you inside several of your prisons so you can speak directly with your corrections officers, not the administration, about the conditions."

Contact Paul Egan: 517-372-8660 or [email protected]. Follow him on X, @paulegan4.

IMAGES

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Address a Cover Letter (With Examples)

    The headline on the image says, "Cover letter format" A woman sits at a table writing on a piece of paper. There's a simple cover letter represented by lines. On one side of the cover letter, there are labels for the sections of the cover letter. The labels are: 1. Date and contact information 2. Salutation/greeting 3. First, introduce yourself 4.

  2. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024 (with Examples)

    How to Address an Email Cover Letter. Use these tips for addressing a cover letter email: Subject Line: 5-10 words—"Job Application for" + position you're applying to. Start with a cover letter salutation like Dear Dr. Manzanilla, Put your name, email address, and phone number at the end.

  3. How to Write a Letter of Application (Example & Tips)

    This is an example of a good job application letter header: 2. Address the hiring manager. The next part of your cover letter is the contact person's information and a salutation (also called a greeting). To get started, write the hiring manager's contact information at the top-left of your letter of application, including their name ...

  4. How to Address Your Cover Letter in 2023

    Rule #1: Address your cover letter to the hiring manager using a formal, full-name salutation (if possible). For a cover letter, you should always default to addressing it to the hiring manager for the position you're applying to. Unless you know for sure that the culture of the company is more casual, use the hiring manager's first and ...

  5. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024: Complete Guide

    Address a Cover Letter with "Dear Hiring Manager". It's the easiest way to address a cover letter without a name. And actually, 40% of managers prefer "Dear Hiring Manager" to any other cover letter salutation. Plus, you can replace the Hiring Manager with a different business title, such as: RIGHT.

  6. How To Write an Application Letter (With Template and Example)

    Follow these steps to compose a compelling application letter: 1. Research the company and job opening. Thoroughly research the company you're applying to and the specifications of the open position. The more you know about the job, the better you can customize your application letter. Look for details like:

  7. How to Address a Cover Letter to Recruiter or Hiring Manager

    Whoever it is, use their full name (first and last name) in the greeting. If you cannot definitively tell the gender of the hiring person, do not use a gender-based title such as "Mr." or "Ms." in the greeting. Instead just use the person's full name. For example, Alex Johnson could be male or female. To avoid a gender mistake, use Dear ...

  8. How to Address a Cover Letter (and Who to Address)

    Here are the most common ways to address a cover letter without a name: To Whom It May Concern. Dear Human Resources Director. Dear Hiring Manager. Dear Recruitment Manager. Additionally, if you want to add a personal touch, address your cover letter to your prospective department or manager.

  9. How to Address a Cover Letter

    2. Second, choose a salutation. Including a salutation is optional and based on personal preference. One option for beginning your cover letter is to simply list the name of the hiring manager followed by a comma. 'Dear' followed by their name and a comma is also a professional way to open your greeting. You should avoid less casual ...

  10. How to address a cover letter (With examples)

    Properly addressing your cover letter is a straightforward process. If you follow these simple steps, you should be able to address your cover letter correctly: 1. Examine the job description to find out the name of the recruitment manager. The first thing you should do when addressing your cover letter is to refer to the job description.

  11. How to address a cover letter + 11 examples [Get noticed]

    When you're reading a job advert, you'll sometimes find the name and email address of the person you need to get in touch with directly in the ad. Look out for the section that says "For enquiries" or "Contact person". For example, the advert might say something like: "For more info, please contact Susan Wright at susan-wright ...

  12. How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

    There are a variety of cover letter salutations you can use to address your email message. If you have a contact person at the company, address the letter to Ms. or Mr. Lastname. If you aren't given a contact person, check to see if you can determine the email recipient's name.

  13. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024 With Examples

    The way you should format a company's address on a cover letter is as follows: [Recipient's Name], [Job Title] [Company Name] [Number and Street Name] [City, State and ZIP Code] Here's an example of how to format a company's address on a cover letter: Dwayne Johnson, Human Resources Manager. Limitless, LLC.

  14. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024

    In that case, you can address your cover letter to the department, faculty, or the company. Alternatively, if you don't have enough information either about the department or the team, you can opt for addressing the cover letter directly to the company's hiring staff, as follows: Dear [Company Name] Hiring Team.

  15. How to Address a Cover Letter (2024 Examples)

    Adding titles when addressing a cover letter. It is acceptable to use a title and the recipient's surname when addressing a cover letter. You could write "Dear Mr Nelson" instead of "Dear Chris Nelson.". You might do this if you do not know your recipient's first name. Call females Ms, unless you know they prefer Miss or Mrs.

  16. How to Address a Cover Letter: From Heading to Date to Salutation + More

    At the very top of your cover letter, in what's called the cover letter header, you'll place your contact details. As we showed you above, it's quite simple: Your First & Last Name. Your Address Line 1. Your Address Line 2. If you want, you can include your phone number or email address, as well.

  17. How to Address and End a Cover Letter: 25 Examples & Tips

    Dear Hiring Manager, But job seekers can often be more specific. Take a look at these examples: Dear Customer Experience Manager, Dear Customer Experience Hiring Team Manager, Some other alternatives include addressing your cover letter to an entire department: Dear Engineering Department, Dear Engineering Team,

  18. How to Address a Cover Letter: A 2022 Guide with 10+ Examples

    And if your cover letter does not have a subject line, it will not show in the hiring manager's list. Here is an example cover letter subject line : Subject line: Job Application for Video Editor Position, Ref: Hanna Moore. 2. Address the Cover Letter in the Correct Way.

  19. How to Write an Application Letter—Examples & Guide

    Letters of application are essential in the job market, so don't risk losing to other candidates just because you didn't write one. 2. Address Your Letter of Application Properly. Addressing an application letter is simple. Firstly, include your contact information in the header of the application letter : Full name.

  20. How to Address a Cover Letter

    Your letter should be professionally formatted with your name, address, phone number, and email address in the top left. On the next line down, add the date. Then, on the left, add the name and address of the recipient. Under that, address the recipient with "Dear [Name]" on the left of the page as well.

  21. How to Address a Cover Letter: Tips + Examples for Every Type

    A cover letter is a formal document, and so it should be addressed as such. The most professional way to do this is with "Dear.". For example: Dear Mr. Miller, Dear Ms. Jones, Dear Dr. Lopez, If you don't know the person's gender or preferred pronouns, you can use their first name. For example: "Dear James Miller.".

  22. How to Properly Address a Cover Letter (with Examples)

    Other options. The most common and acceptable way to address a cover letter when the letter's recipient is unknown is by using the 'Dear Hiring Manager" greeting. Still, you can use other alternative greetings, including: Dear IT Department. Dear Company ABC Hiring Manager/Recruiter. Dear Head of Nursing.

  23. 6 Examples: How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    Here are some examples: Dear Hiring Manager, - This is a common and universally understood phrase for addressing a cover letter without a name. Dear [Job Title], - Use the specific job position that the recipient holds, for instance, Dear Marketing Director. To the [Job Title] Selection Committee, - This approach can be useful when ...

  24. 7 Essential Tips on How to Format a Cover Letter

    Finally, very few cover letters or resumes are send as a blank word document these days. There are a wide choice of resume and cover letter templates - it is a great idea to use the same visual look for both your cover letter and resume. When a hiring manager is viewing a large number of candidates, this association will stick in their minds.

  25. Cover Letters 101: Should You Address Your Letter 'To Whom It ...

    4. When in Doubt, Ask. If the job listing provides a contact number or email for queries, don't hesitate to reach out and ask for the name of the hiring manager.

  26. Social Workers, Marriage & Family Therapists, Professional Counselors

    The State Board of Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Counselors protects the public from unprofessional, improper, unauthorized and unqualified practice of social work, licensed marriage and family therapy and licensed professional counseling.

  27. Letter: Catching rainwater runoff could help address water issues

    Water stored in cisterns is available for watering crops, animals, lawns, driveways, the family dog, and possibly for human use as well.

  28. Corrections officers to Whitmer: Mobilize National Guard to address

    A Whitmer spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but the department put out a statement that said it has taken a series of steps to address the staffing shortage and ...

  29. Addressing guidelines

    Postal Box addresses with civic address and additional delivery information should contain: The addressee (first line) Additional delivery information (second line) Civic address (third line) Postal Box number and station information (fourth line) Municipality name, province or territory, and postal code (fifth line)

  30. Misleading social media advice leads to false claims for Fuel Tax

    File a complete and accurate return within 30 days of receiving the IRS letter or notice. This may include submitting an amended tax return for each taxable period where an inappropriate claim was filed. If applicable, attach the IRS letter received (such as, 3176C) to your corrected return and mail it to the address listed on the ...